Prospective Ordinariate priest, Dr. Antonio Contreras, dies tragically

The Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter has announced the tragic death of former Episcopal priest Antonio Contreras-Rodriguez, who was the pastor of a prospective Ordinariate community in Flushing, NY.

antonio contreras RIPIt is with great sadness that we report the death of our dear brother Dr. Antonio Contreras, 45, a candidate for ordination to the priesthood in the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter.  Dr. Contreras, who formerly served as an Episcopal Priest in the Diocese of Long Island, was on tour of India and Sri Lanka when he apparently suffered a fatal heart attack in early August.

This past spring, Dr. Contreras led a group of his former parishioners into the Catholic Church, and they were worshiping at St. Michael’s Parish in Flushing, NY.

Arrangements are pending.

He was born in Puerto Rico on August 21, 1968, and was ordained an Episcopal priest in 2005.  He served the San Jorge, Flushing, and La Santa Cruz, Brooklyn, neighborhoods.  He also worked as a school psychologist in Yonkers.

Please keep his family and parishioners in your prayers

Interestingly, his former Episcopal bishop is presiding at a Thanksgiving liturgy for the life of Fr. Contreras in his own cathedral this evening!

The website of the Episcopal Diocese of  Long Island announced:

August 9, 2014

It is with deep sadness that The Diocese of Long Island announces the death of the Rev. Dr. Antonio Contreras.

Padre Contreras died of a heart attack this morning, August 9,  while on pilgrimage in Sri Lanka.

Padre Antonio was born in Puerto Rico on August 21, 1968 and ordained priest in the Diocese of Long Island by the Rt. Rev. Orris Walker on April 24, 2005.

Most of his priesthood was spent serving the San Jorge, Flushing and La Santa Cruz, Brooklyn communities where he was known for his dynamic preaching and his generous pastoral heart.

In addition to his priestly duties, Padre Antonio worked as a school psychologist in Yonkers.

Please keep Padre Antonio and his family in your prayers.

 

Updated Posting August 22, 2014:

AUG 27, 6 pm – Invitation to Liturgy of Thanksgiving for Father Antonio Contreras-Rodriguez at the Cathedral of the Incarnation.

In honor of the life and ministry of Father Antonio Contreras-Rodriguez, who died on Saturday, August 9, Bishop Provenzano will preside at a Liturgy of Thanksgiving at the Cathedral of the Incarnation on Wednesday, August 27 at 6:00 pm.

Liturgical color: white

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38 Responses to Prospective Ordinariate priest, Dr. Antonio Contreras, dies tragically

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    David,

    You wrote: The Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter has announced the tragic death of former Episcopal priest Antonio Contreras-Rodriguez, who was the pastor of a prospective Ordinariate community in Flushing, NY.

    This is truly tragic!

    JTOL, is it likely that the Msgr. Steenson will appoint Fr. Belen Gonzalez y Perez as the pastor or administrator of his congregation? Flushing is not very far from Brooklyn, where Fr. Belen Gonzalez y Perez currently resides.

    You wrote: Interestingly, his former Episcopal bishop is presiding at a Thanksgiving liturgy for the life of Fr. Contreras in his own cathedral this evening!

    This is indeed a very charitable act, but also undoubtedly a very pastoral response to the members of his diocese who knew Fr. Contreras. I pray that it will contribute in a positive way, however great or small, to ecumenical relations!

    Norm.

  2. EPMS says:

    Yes, since the former parishioners of Fr Contreras have not completed their catechesis it is important to provide leadership. Fifty people is a large group by OCSP standards. Presumably they are worshipping at a regular OF service at St Michael’s. I suppose those who find it congenial might conclude that the Ordinariate is not a necessary part of the package.

    • Why should you suppose that, EPMS? If the diocesan community is more congenial for an ex-Anglican than the Ordinariate, we are doing something wrong. We can only pray that the untimely death of Fr. Contreras does not cause some of his parishioners to lose heart. A quick appointment of Fr. Belen Gonzalez y Perez might help, since it would appear that the community is mainly of Hispanic origin.

      • godfrey1099 says:

        1. Fr. Belen Gonzalez y Perez is even actually interviewed in the YouTube material you have found (great thanks, David!).
        2. A more general point, however, is that much of what is happening in the Ordinariates does fall “under the radar” (using EPMS’s phrase). Hence, only God and a very narrow group of people around the Ordinaries know how many people or groups have actually expressed interest in joining the Ordinariate, but must plan for it carefully. It is not strange, as confidentiality – mentioned in each and every contact form associated with Ordinariates – is an important part of the process for obvious reasons.

      • The thanks are due to EPMS, who did the research spadework!

    • EPMS says:

      Why would it be wrong for a former Episcopalian to join a diocesan Catholic parish rather than an Ordinariate group? Further, I may have misheard, but I got the impression that the catechumen who was interviewed was actually a former Catholic. In Toronto I understand that about half the membership of the Spanish-language Anglican parishes have come from the Catholic church. I don’t know if this is the case in the US, but I gather this was Fr Gonzalez y Perez’s background.

      • EPMS, I did not say that it would be wrong for a potential convert from Anglicanism to join a diocesan parish, but that it might indicate that the Ordinariate has not done its job properly if the person finds the parish more “congenial”. Possible mistakes are: not creating a clear and attractive Ordinariate identity, not accompanying the group sufficiently (Msgr. Steenson’s visit to Flushing was a fantastic idea in this regard), not providing a pastor rapidly enough (two groups in the UK are in this situation), etc.

        I would, however, point out that converts from Orthodoxy are automatically members of the corresponding Uniate Church (converts from Anglicanism are not automatically members of the Ordinariate – perhaps they should be).

        David Murphy

      • EPMS says:

        Godfrey1099, I agree that confidentiality is important for an active priest in any branch of the Anglican church who is exploring membership in the Ordinariate. An ACC priest in fact lost his job when this was discovered. But otherwise I fail to see the necessity, and in fact we see that the ordination of Fr Gonzalez y Perez, or the existence of this exploratory group in Flushing was by no means “under the radar.” in any local sense; I easily found half a dozen local articles/videos on each story. And my initial concern was for local people who might wish to be involved. One should be able to google “Ordinariate” and the name of one’s city and find out if there is anything going on, and I think that generally one can. But these events were certainly “under the radar” for us, the wider interested readership, because until now there has been no official news source to disseminate them.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        David,

        You wrote: I would, however, point out that converts from Orthodoxy are automatically members of the corresponding Uniate Church (converts from Anglicanism are not automatically members of the Ordinariate – perhaps they should be).

        Actually, the general instructions in the Rite of Reception of Baptized Christians into the Full Communion of the Catholic Church state that it is not appropriate to use the word “convert” in reference thereto. The word “convert” implies a change of fundamental beliefs. Since these people are already Christians (they profess the whole of the Nicene Creed or the Apostle’s Creed in their former congregations), such a change of fundamental beliefs does not exist.

        Having said that, there is a major difference between the sui juris ritual churches and the ordinariates. The sui juris are separate from the Roman Rite, governed by the Codex Canonum Ecclesiarum Orientalium (“Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches”) and their proper law, whereas the ordinariaes are part of the Roman Rite and thus subject to its Codex Juris Canonici (“Code of Canon Law”).

        There is, however, a significant progression here. With the formation of ordinariates, the so-called “Anglican Use” began as a handful of parishes and chaplaincies that were part of various dioceses here in the States to its own “particular churches” that are canonically and functionally equivalent to archdioceses subject directly to the Vatican, whose ordinaries have the same canonical authority as diocesan bishops. The next logical step in this progression, although probably a few years off, would be the establishment of a proper hierarchy, thus constituting a sui juris ritual church. For historic reasons, however, the see of such an entity should be that of Canterbury — which means that it probably won’t come about until the Anglican Communion returns to the full communion of the Catholic Church. Unfortunately, the present trend of “reforms” within certain provinces of the Anglican Communion are making this look less and less imminent.

        In the interim, however, we are likely to see significant evolution of the present ordinariate structure as the ordinariates grow.

        >> 1. It is very likely that some of the ordinariates will grow sufficiently to allow them to split geographically, likely forming a provincial structure similar to that of Catholic dioceses in most places, with one of the ordinariates becoming an “archordinariate” that functions as a metropolitan see for all of the ordinariates formed by the geographical split.

        >> 2. It’s also likely that ordinariates will assume more administrative functions, such as establishing their own tribunals to process cases of decrees of nullity of marriage, in due course, and thus will evolve to look more like normal Catholic dioceses. This, however, requires a sufficient staff of canon lawyers and other specialists.

        >> 3. And if clerical celibacy gains sufficient traction in the ordinariates to ensure sufficient availability of candidates for episcopal office, the ordinariates that have established tribunals and other administrative functions probably will officially become personal dioceses.

        There is a lot of potential for a bright future here!

        Norm.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        EPMS,

        You wrote:
        But otherwise I fail to see the necessity, and in fact we see that the ordination of Fr Gonzalez y Perez, or the existence of this exploratory group in Flushing was by no means “under the radar.” in any local sense; I easily found half a dozen local articles/videos on each story. And my initial concern was for local people who might wish to be involved. One should be able to google “Ordinariate” and the name of one’s city and find out if there is anything going on, and I think that generally one can. But these events were certainly “under the radar” for us, the wider interested readership, because until now there has been no official news source to disseminate them.

        This is not exactly a realistic expectation of web search technology. One might have learned of this community, or at least of its late pastor, if one had guessed to search on “ordinariate Flushing” — but that would be a lucky guess. A search on “ordinariate New York” probably would have turned up neither the Flushing congregation nor Fr. Belen Gonzalez y Perez, even though both are within the geographical limits of the city of New York.

        Norm.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: Yes, since the former parishioners of Fr Contreras have not completed their catechesis it is important to provide leadership. Fifty people is a large group by OCSP standards.

      I agree!

      And the fact that none of us had heard of either this community or its leader before the leader’s untimely death illustrates the very degree to which much of what is happening in terms of Anglican clergy and congregations coming to ordinariates is completely “under the radar” and we find out only after the fact.

      You wrote: Presumably they are worshipping at a regular OF service at St Michael’s.

      That is less clear.

      Does it seem plausible that Fr. Belen Gonzalez y Perez might be celebrating mass according to Divine Worship for this community, and perhaps also participating in the formation of this community for reception into the full communion of the Catholic Church?

      You wrote: I suppose those who find it congenial might conclude that the Ordinariate is not a necessary part of the package.

      I rather suspect that those who have personal bonds within the affected congregation will want to remain members thereof.

      Norm.

  3. EPMS says:

    Although we do have the example of the group in Newtown Sq for whom Fr Ousley is celebrating mass despite the fact that none of them can receive communion yet, I do not think this is a typical arrangement, so no, it does not seem plausible that there has been an Ordinariate rite mass regularly celebrated for this group at St Michael’s. Certainly the parish webpage says nothing to this effect.

    • EPMS says:

      PS This article http://thetablet.org/journeying-in-faith-future-ordinariate-catholics-mourn-late-pastor-consider-next-steps/ says the group has been worshipping at the 1:30 pm Spanish mass at St Michael’s.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: I do not think this is a typical arrangement, so no, it does not seem plausible that there has been an Ordinariate rite mass regularly celebrated for this group at St Michael’s. Certainly the parish webpage says nothing to this effect.

      The significant detail here is that there is no approved Spanish translation of Divine Worship (the approved liturgical books of the Anglican tradition) as yet. Thus, the only liturgy available to ordinariate congregations for celebration in Spanish is the ordinary form of the Roman Rite.

      When one must celebrate the ordinary form of the Roman Rite anyway, it probably does not matter whether the group attends a normal parish mass or has its own. There’s a lot more intense personal interaction and bonding as a community will happen in their formation program than in mass, strengthening their cohesion as a distinct community.

      Norm.

  4. EPMS says:

    Norm, if you lived in Brooklyn you would probably not google Ordinariate New York to find a nearby service, but if you did you would find the same articles I did. I know this because I just tried it. Regarding the 15 groups in formation, we do know of most of them. For example, we have had a fair amount of news about the groups in Edmonton, Fredericton, Newtown Sq, and Flushing, none of which appear on the list of “Communities” on the OCSP website. The latter seems to occur only after the official reception of members and sometimes not immediately even then.

    • godfrey1099 says:

      I kindly disagree.
      Let me repeat my question: before the anouncement of Fr. Contreras’ death, did you or did you not realise that in NY there was a group of 50 people with a pastor in a process of preparation to form an Ordinariate community?
      If no, then it is quite natural to assume that in fact we do not know about a number of similar groups “in formation” or – even more so – at the inquiry stage.
      And I do not share your view that “we know most of the 15 groups in formation”, either.
      Overall, this clearly indicates that there is a steady interest in the Ordinariate (which fortunately remains an open-ended offer).

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: Norm, if you lived in Brooklyn you would probably not google Ordinariate New York to find a nearby service, but if you did you would find the same articles I did. I know this because I just tried it.

      Yes, I realized after the fact that I picked a bad example because New York also happened to be the name of the state — and your search probably also turned up articles on the Fellowship of St. Alban in Rochester, which is also in the State of New York.

      You wrote: For example, we have had a fair amount of news about the groups in Edmonton, Fredericton, Newtown Sq, and Flushing, none of which appear on the list of “Communities” on the OCSP website. The latter seems to occur only after the official reception of members and sometimes not immediately even then.

      It seems to be more nuanced than that. St. Benedict in Edmonton, for example, is a “public association of the faithful” — but I suspect that it was erected as an association of the Archdiocese of Edmonton rather than as an association of the Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. The fact that the members thereof have enrolled in the ordinariate does not move the association to the ordinariate. That requires a separate paper shuffle, which apparently has not yet happened — and it may be “on hold” by mutual decision of the ordinary and the Archbishop of Edmonton because the group remains under the pastoral care of a diocesan chaplain. I suspect that the situation in Fredericton is similar.

      Norm.

  5. EPMS says:

    I forgot the inquirers’ group in Bath, PA, about which Mr Murphy reported in January. I am sure that with a little time I could turn up an article on each of the other ten groups in formation. The point is, if I were starting a new ecclesiastical venture I would have a link on the main website along the lines of “Find a Group Near You”, with a follow-up about who to contact if you were interested but could not find a group reasonably nearby. I see no reason to keep this information secret, other than the identities of any active Anglican clergy involved.

    • godfrey1099 says:

      According to St. Thomas More’s monthly newsletters, the group in Bath is not the “inquirers’ group” at all. It is definitely not “in formation” any more, either. It is a group of already received Ordinariate Catholics, which at the moment has a status of a kind of a ‘mission parish’ served by priests from Scranton, with a separate budget and an objective of becoming a stand-alone community in the future.
      As I regularly google the web for different combinations of words related to Ordinariates myself, I really doubt that you would be able to identify all groups “in formation” or even half of them.
      And the case of the group in Flushing clearly proves my point, as you have been able to find pieces of information only afterwards.

  6. EPMS says:

    Well, you are correct that I only LOOKED for information on the group in Flushing after I knew it existed. But now that I know there are 15 groups out there I think I can track them down. We shall see.

    • EPMS says:

      PS My task is complicated by the fact that the OCSP website actually shows 37 groups as having been received, not 35. Does this mean the 15 pending are now 13?

      • Can you find 13, EPMS, that is the question?. If you then actually find 15 or more, so much the better. The numbers in the diocesan newspaper will no doubt be approximations. In any case, it would seem that there is not going to be a “second wave” in North America, but a constant trickle, which is much more promising.

        Similarly in the UK there are now 53 groups listed on the Ordinariate website and no longer 45, which was the number regularly quoted. And I don’t know how many groups or religious communities are “pending”.

        In Australia the whole of the Torres Strait has been pending for some time. (And there the Ordinariate actually calls itself a diocese by the way, Norm).

      • Rev22:17 says:

        David,

        You wrote: In Australia the whole of the Torres Strait has been pending for some time. (And there the Ordinariate actually calls itself a diocese by the way, Norm).

        I remember seeing that reference, though I can’t relocate it at the moment, but my impression at the time was that it probably was a journalistic misfire. There’s also a similar error in the inclusion of the “Diocese of The Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter” in the list of dioceses and bishops on the web site of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), which is probably the work of a webmaster who misfired. Nevertheless, these errors clearly do not change the canonical status of the respective ordinariates.

        There is a practical reality here, though. Most members of the Anglican Communion have no idea what an “ordinariate” is, so we need to explain the term to them — and the easiest way to do this is by analogy to a canonically equivalent entity that they do recognize.

        Norm.

      • The reference is in The Portal Magazine (Page 10 in August 2014) where it states “The Diocese of Our Lady of the Southern Cross”.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        David,

        You wrote: In any case, it would seem that there is not going to be a “second wave” in North America, but a constant trickle, which is much more promising.

        There will be a constant trickle of whole communities coming into the ordinariates in the United Kingdom and in Australia as well.

        The difference, in the United Kingdom, is that the heterodox “reforms” of the “progressives” has not progressed as far in the Church of England (CoE) as in the United States and Canada. A few months ago, we all anticipated that the course of events surrounding ordination of female bishops in the Church of England (CoE) would trigger an exodus of so-called “Anglo-Catholic” clergy because the “progressives” who were not willing to tolerate accommodations acceptable to the so-called “Anglo-Catholic” side appeared to have the votes to ram though their proposals. Much to the surprise of many, cooler heads prevailed and the measure that actually gained approval contains at least the appearance of sufficient accommodation to satisfy the “Anglo-Catholic” contingent, but there’s still a very real possibility that inadequacies in the implementation of those accommodations, or a failure to do so, easily could be the trigger. Nevertheless, even if the CoE does implement these accommodations effectively, it seems very likely that some other element of the “progressive” agenda that are contrary to scripture — blessing (or “marriage”) of “same sex” unions, overtly homosexual clergy, etc. — will trigger a mass exodus from the CoE, producing a second wave, at some point in the future.

        That said, the other question is the future of evangelical Christians who remain within the CoE, The Episcopal Church (TEC) here in the States, the Anglican Church in Canada (ACC), and the Anglican Church in Australia (ACA). Evangelical Christians generally seem to accept ordination of women, as there is no prohibition thereof anywhere in scripture, but they are not willing to tolerate practices contrary to scripture, such as celebration of homosexual unions or promotion of clergy whose lives are contrary to scriptural norms. If lead elements of these groups find a warm reception within the ordinariates, it’s very likely that word will get around and more will follow. The result may be more of a prolonged swell than a tidal wave, but the effect will be similar: large growth of the respective ordinariates in a relatively short time.

        Norm.

    • EPMS says:

      In the course of working through the 50 US states I have discovered a number of former TEC clergy who have been ordained in the last two years through the “Pastoral Provision.” The priests in question are being ordained for their local diocese. This could reflect the need for a stipend and benefits, so fair enough. But there is clearly no intent to reach out in the spirit of AC to other local Episcopalians or former Episcopalians, even in areas where no Ordinariate group currently exists. Although the OCSP is often mentioned, it is something the reporter adds as a related idea, nothing that plays a part in the priest’s own story, past or future. As I frequently mention, thousands of former Protestants join the Catholic church each year. Do we over-estimate the role that Ordinariates may have to play?

      • You are referring to a specific problem of the United States, where the Pastoral Provision is still in place and had been altered to permit individual Anglican priests to become diocesan Catholic priests. This is now considered by the US bishops’ conference to be the standard route if the priest has no prospective Ordinariate group which he is pastoring. I hope that the Ordinariate can convince the bishops otherwise as soon as possible.

        I believe that we should take to heart the mission statement quoted on the websites both of the Scottish Ordinariate and of Most Precious Blood, London, namely:

        “Our mission is to be a place where members of the Anglican Church can feel ‘at home’ in surroundings which are familiar culturally and liturgically; and come to realise that the Ordinariate is now the normative route for those who are attentive to their Anglican heritage and feel drawn to achieving full visible unity with the Holy See.”

        David Murphy

      • EPMS says:

        Well, the mission statement says, appropriately, that the Ordinariate is the “normative route for those who are attentive to their Anglican heritage, etc” . But what about those who are not attentive? And on a related subject, apropos of a comment Norm made, I have been looking over the Spanish-language BCP published by TEC and trying unsuccessfully to see any specifically Anglican elements which would require a Spanish-language BDW down the road.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        David,

        You wrote: You are referring to a specific problem of the United States, where the Pastoral Provision is still in place and had been altered to permit individual Anglican priests to become diocesan Catholic priests. This is now considered by the US bishops’ conference to be the standard route if the priest has no prospective Ordinariate group which he is pastoring. I hope that the Ordinariate can convince the bishops otherwise as soon as possible.

        The practical reality is that ordination for the local diocese under the so-called “pastoral provision” may be the only practicable option for many of the candidates due to their financial situations: dioceses now have enough resources to pay salaries and benefits, whereas the OCSP presently does not.

        Here, I should also point out that ordination of former Protestant and former Anglican clergy for diocesan ministry is not unique to the United States. The Vatican has granted rescripts for ordination of married former Anglican and former Protestant clergy as Catholic presbyters throughout the world fairly routinely for over fifty years. The so-called pastoral provision did only two things: (1) established a central office to facilitate processing of a large number of applications from former Anglican clergy that arose in the late 1970’s in the United States, and that is ongoing, and (2) provided for erection of personal parishes, missions, and chaplaincies that could worship according to the Book of Divine Worship for congregations of former Anglicans. And in reality, these faculties also were available everywhere. Note that the Parish of St. John the Evangelist was erected as a personal parish of the Diocese of Calgary before the OCSP came into being.

        You continued: I believe that we should take to heart the mission statement quoted on the websites both of the Scottish Ordinariate and of Most Precious Blood, London, namely:

        “Our mission is to be a place where members of the Anglican Church can feel ‘at home’ in surroundings which are familiar culturally and liturgically; and come to realise that the Ordinariate is now the normative route for those who are attentive to their Anglican heritage and feel drawn to achieving full visible unity with the Holy See.” (boldface yours)

        Let’s try the boldface differently.

        “Our mission is to be a place where members of the Anglican Church can feel ‘at home’ in surroundings which are familiar culturally and liturgically; and come to realise that the Ordinariate is now the normative route for those who are attentive to their Anglican heritage and feel drawn to achieving full visible unity with the Holy See.”

        For those to whom the Anglican liturgical heritage is not so important, diocesan ministry or, for laity, reception into a diocesan parish remains available.

        Norm.

  7. EPMS says:

    Well, let’s start with trying to find 13. Godfrey1099 suggested that only groups awaiting reception into the Catholic church should be counted, but I am going with groups awaiting either reception into the Church or recognition as an official Ordinariate community. This seems to be a separate
    process. So I would include Bath, PA, since the intention is clearly for it to become a self- sustaining mission/parish; it has its own bank account, for example. I would also include St Michael’s in Flushing, NY; St Benedict’s Edmonton, AB; Newtown Sq, PA; and Fredericton, NB. I am not including the former ACCC group from Tyendinaga led by Gérard Trinque as it is not clear to me whether they have maintained a separate identity within their current parish. Canada’s major centres seem to have been accounted for, I would say. It was reported here in February 2014 that the Our Lady of Hope Society of Kansas City, MO had moved from the Pastoral Provision to the OCSP but it still does not appear on the OCSP “Communities” list. Not a new venture, of course, so I won’t count it either. Still looking.

    • So far, I have only found the seven you mention. Have already written to the priest who originally mentored the Tyendinaga group to see what has happened there. (I would include Kansas City, as they fulfil your criteria.)

      David

      Update:

      Fr. Richard Whalen of Belleville, ON has replied, saying:

      “Yes, I visit Christ the King Parish once a month to celebrate the Ordinariate Mass with a group of 25 or so primarily Mohawk faithful who were received into the Roman Catholic Church by Archbishop Brendan O’Brien of the Archdiocese of Kingston, Ontario, in April 2012. We celebrate our liturgies in the Elders’ Lodge on the Tyendinaga Reserve. The former pastor of the community which was traditional Anglican is “Father” Gerard Trinque. He has not received ordination in the RC Church, but he does still conduct Communion Services with the parish on the Sundays when I cannot celebrate the Eucharist. Although I am not a member of the Ordinariate, it has been agreed by the Archbishop and Fr. Kenyon, that I would offer liturgical ministry for the parish.”

      • EPMS says:

        Thank you for going the extra mile for this update. Since the group is not on the list of Communities we can add it to “pending”.

  8. EPMS says:

    Apropos of Norm’s comment of August 31 at 9:36 pm, in attempting to track down various parish groups who were previously identified as exploring entry to the OCSP, I found several stories about Fr Oliver Vietor in Phoenix, AZ. He is described in 2010 as being received into the Catholic church with 18 or so former Episcopal parishioners, attending an Anglican Use conference, seeking ordination under the Pastoral Provision. Now he is on the staff of a large Phoenix parish with no suggestion of any specific ministry to former Anglicans. Indeed, the Ship of Fools review of this parish mentions that it doesn’t even have a coffee hour.

  9. Father Lee Kenyon confirms that there are three pending communities in Canada. He writes that Our Lady of the Sign, Fredericton Junction and Christ the King, Tyendinaga are “simply communities (or, rather, groups of Ordinariate members who worship together), rather than Public Associations of the Faithful”, which is what St Benedict’s, Edmonton is (as well as the other Canadian groups except St John the Evangelist in Calgary, “the only Quasi-Parish. No others in the offing, alas.”)

    • Rev22:17 says:

      David,

      You wrote: He writes that Our Lady of the Sign, Fredericton Junction and Christ the King, Tyendinaga are “simply communities (or, rather, groups of Ordinariate members who worship together), rather than Public Associations of the Faithful”, which is what St Benedict’s, Edmonton is…

      This is, in many ways, a canonical technicality. In order to become a “public association of the faithful,” a group must develop an organizational document such as a constitution or bylaws, canonically called “statutes,” and have it approved by a competent authority (the respective ordinary if the organization is part of an ordinariate or the local diocesan bishop if the organization is part of the local diocese). This process formalizes the group as a canonical entity. If the organization is to acquire property, it typically also must become a civil corporation and its “statutes” must meet applicable requirements of secular law.

      That said, a “chaplaincy” need not have such an organizational document.

      Norm.

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