Is the Ordinariate called to be “Spikey”?

Father Albert Scharbach, priest administrator of Mount Calvary Church in Baltimore, posted the following on the parish’s blog:

Spikey Worship on the Assumption

assumptionThe Feast of the Assumption is the highest feast day of our Lady and a Holy Day of Obligation. It is also the day on which I was first ordained as an Anglican priest.

When I was ordained as an Anglican at Good Shepherd, Rosemont, that parish pushed the limits by celebrating the Feast Day and pulling out all the stops. “Spikey” was the word that Anglicans gave to parishes who unapologetically honored the Blessed Virgin Mary with pomp and praise. Marian devotion remains controversial in the Anglican world!

While it was good to push the limits as Anglo-Catholics, it is much better to be home in the Catholic Church, where the Assumption is a big feast day wherever you go.

Mount Calvary was always one of the most “spikey” parishes, always pushing the limits of what Catholic devotion and piety could be tolerated in the Episcopal Church. But now the parish is home and the Feast of the Assumption with its Marian hymns is par for course.

To an extent. Because it seems that nothing that Mount Calvary does is merely par for the course. The parish will celebrate this feast with characteristic ardor and devotion, in beauty and truth. May the tradition of being “spikey” continue to the extent that our worship goes all out, so that the faithful lift up their hearts with renewed enthusiasm and joy.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Is the Ordinariate called to be “Spikey”?

  1. Will Roper says:

    To the question in the title, I would say “yes and no.”

    For those communities that come from a “spikey” tradition, they should continue to be what they are. The inclination to “outdo” the Catholics in being Catholic is what helped pave the way for the Ordinariate, and it is an authentic tradition.

    At the same time, there are communities and individuals in the Ordinariate whose journey to the Catholic Church passed through a more “low church” or evangelical tradition. This is a legitimate spirituality in the Anglican patrimony, and through the Ordinariate should also be encouraged to find its place and expression in the Catholic Church (which has a similar tradition within it).

    The important thing is for both “spikey” and “low church” Ordinariate Catholics to avoid the excesses/distortions to which their traditions are inclined.

    And the *most* important thing is for them both to refrain from criticizing each other for what is authentically Catholic in each other’s practice.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Will,

      You wrote: For those communities that come from a “spikey” tradition, they should continue to be what they are. The inclination to “outdo” the Catholics in being Catholic is what helped pave the way for the Ordinariate, and it is an authentic tradition.

      At the same time, there are communities and individuals in the Ordinariate whose journey to the Catholic Church passed through a more “low church” or evangelical tradition. This is a legitimate spirituality in the Anglican patrimony, and through the Ordinariate should also be encouraged to find its place and expression in the Catholic Church (which has a similar tradition within it).

      The important thing is for both “spikey” and “low church” Ordinariate Catholics to avoid the excesses/distortions to which their traditions are inclined.

      Yes, I agree completely!

      You continued: And the *most* important thing is for them both to refrain from criticizing each other for what is authentically Catholic in each other’s practice.

      You mean, they actually should refrain from imitating the most obnoxious behavior of both the most radical “Modernists” and the most ardent “Traditionalists” whom we have to endure within the Catholic Church, and respect each other?

      Such a radical concept!

      And rooted in the gospel, no less….

      Norm.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s