The Portal – September 2014

By clicking on the cover photo below you can read the PDF version of this month’s The Portal with two insightful articles from Msgr Harry Entwistle and full info on the Called to be One day (6 Sept) and the Ordinariate Festival in London (19 – 21 Sept)

The Portal - Sept 2014By the way, in his second article Monsignor Entwistle answers some of our questions about the appointment of Fr. Lyall Cowell as administrator of the diocesan parish in Mullumbimby. He writes:

“In several cities at this stage, there is only one Ordinariate group, but more than one priest. One of the reasons we are in full Catholic unity is to bring the gifts of the English Tradition back to the wider Catholic Church. The most tangible expression of our patrimony is found in the liturgies of the Ordinariate.

Using the misquote from the film, ‘Field of Dreams,’ “build it and they (he) will come,” I am asking bishops to identify a church in a suburb some distance from the Ordinariate group, or in another part of the diocese where an Ordinariate mass can be said on a regular basis with the intention of gathering a new group. The bishop of one diocese where no Ordinariate group exists has accepted an Ordinariate priest on loan for a set period, to be administrator of the local parish as well as being charged with trying to establish an Ordinariate presence in his diocese.”

This is very different from the current practice, namely that the Ordinariate Use Mass can and should only be celebrated for existing Ordinariate communities. I very much welcome this missionary venture and would advocate emulating it in the other Ordinariates.

David Murphy

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4 Responses to The Portal – September 2014

  1. EPMS says:

    Although the OOLW has more priests than the OCSP, the number of laity is similar as are the financial resources, I would imagine. Yet the monthly Portal, which has existed almost from the beginning, is a notably more sophisticated venture than the late-appearing and currently quarterly Ordinariate Observer, under the direction of a communication co-ordinator who has only been appointed recently, several years after the erection of the OCSP. Yes, I have complained about articles with a defeatist tone in the Portal, but that does seem to be lightening. The important thing is that there is an editorial presence reinforcing the sense that the Ordinariates are co-ordinated ventures with direction and purpose. The article about using OLSC clergy in diocesan ministry to try a kind of “group-planting” shows imagination, as just one example. Meanwhile central news sources at the OCSP, such as they are, seem overly-excited about the new Chancery, which after all is just an administrative building, and one soaking up millions of dollars for which one might imagine other uses with more direct impact on evangelisation and growth.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: Meanwhile central news sources at the OCSP, such as they are, seem overly-excited about the new Chancery, which after all is just an administrative building, and one soaking up millions of dollars for which one might imagine other uses with more direct impact on evangelisation and growth.

      I don’t agree with you on this. It’s rather difficult to coordinate programs and activities that will grow and strengthen the ordinariate while working out of make-do office space that’s not even in the same location, with no space for planning meetings and such.

      Also, the indication is that the “new chancery” also will provide space for some parish activities at the ordinariate’s principal church.

      Norm.

  2. EPMS says:

    “[N]ot even in the same location” as what? Fr Scott Hurd served as the first Vicar General of OCSP until July of this year from Washington, DC. Physical location counts for little in a quasi-diocese covering all of North America.

  3. Rev22:17 says:

    EPMS,

    You wrote: “[N]ot even in the same location” as what? Fr Scott Hurd served as the first Vicar General of OCSP until July of this year from Washington, DC. Physical location counts for little in a quasi-diocese covering all of North America.

    Actually, Fr. Scott Hurd is a vicar general of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter through the end of this year — and that appointment could be extended by agreement of the ordinary and the Archbishop of Washington. The ordinariate has two vicar generals right now — not an uncommon situation in a Catholic diocese. Going forward, I would not be surprised if the ordinary appoints another vicar general on the east coast to replace Fr. Scott Hurd at the end of the year: having someone near the cluster of communities in New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and the Carolinas who can act as his agent in routine administrative matters can cut down on a lot of travel and the associated expenses.

    But having said that, Fr. Scott Hurd probably has been racking up more than a few frequent flier miles travelling to Houston for meetings of the ordinariate staff in addition to those earned visiting ordinariate communities and prospective ordinariate communities. It’s true that modern telecommunication technology and overnight courier services have made it possible to conduct business efficiently with less frequent meetings in person than it times past, but there still comes a time when collaborators need to meet in person in order to accomplish some tasks. In the ordinariates, the need for strict confidentiality especially with respect to those who are applying to the ordinariate from positions of ministry in other denominations may give rise to more frequent need to meet in person. Telecommunications simply are not secure, and thus are useless in matters requiring that degree of confidentiality.

    My point about the new chancery, however, was quite simple. Right now, the ordinary has to find available space at St. Thomas University and or in facilities built for the parish which is the ordinariate’s principal church to conduct meetings, etc., which means that those events must be scheduled around university/seminary or parish activities, and the working arrangements with his administrative assistants probably are also less than ideal. Also, the ordinariate will need to add some administrative functions as it grows — an office to support Christian formation and sacramental preparation, an office to support ministry to families, and an office to support evangelization (probably one person each) would seem to be the most immediate priorities, and a marriage tribunal also could be in the works in the next decade or so. I doubt that the existing facilities of the principal church would have been able to accommodate any of this; hence the need for a new building.

    Norm.

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