Australia-Wide – September 2014

On the day when the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of the Southern Cross, Australia, launches its revamped website, here is the September edition of the Ordinariate newsletter “Australia-Wide”. Just click on the banner heading below:

Australia-Wide - Sept 2014In the absence of a Canadian newsletter (“Ecce” having been closed down), Australia-Wide has mutated into a source of information on the Deanery of St. John the Baptist in the form of a letter from the Dean, Father Lee Kenyon. (In fact we learn more here than in the CSP newletter “The Ordinariate Observer”.)

There is also a good message from the Ordinary, Msgr Entwistle, on the newly-founded Supporters’ Network, which I shall repost here.

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15 Responses to Australia-Wide – September 2014

  1. EPMS says:

    Apropos of Fr Kenyon’s update on the Canadian Deanery, what are we to make of an Ordinariate community which worships exclusively at a Latin Rite service in a diocesan parish? I assume this is not an interim arrangement, since their former rector is not seeking ordination. No doubt the group enjoys a social bond, but I can see no basis for any evangelical outreach in this arrangement. What purpose would Ordinariate membership serve here?

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: Apropos of Fr Kenyon’s update on the Canadian Deanery, what are we to make of an Ordinariate community which worships exclusively at a Latin Rite service in a diocesan parish? I assume this is not an interim arrangement, since their former rector is not seeking ordination. No doubt the group enjoys a social bond, but I can see no basis for any evangelical outreach in this arrangement. What purpose would Ordinariate membership serve here?

      First, I’m not sure that we should make anything of an ordinariate group that “worships exclusively at a Latin Rite service in a diocesan parish” since the ordinariates are part of the Roman Rite, and have faculties to use the ordinary form of the Roman Rite if they wish. Indeed, it is very reasonable for ordinariate congregations that worshipped according to the ordinary form of the Roman Rite as Anglicans to continue that practice after reception into the full communion of the Catholic Church. Although the Anglican variant of the mass is one element of Anglican patrimony that is worthy of preservation and reception within the Catholic Church, it is not the only element of Anglican patrimony to fall into that category. A congregation that assists in a mass of a diocesan parish can still preserve other elements of Anglican patrimony that are equally praiseworthy: the Anglican tradition of liturgical music, customs such as public prayer of morning prayer and Evensong, etc.

      Second, the fact that a community’s former Anglican pastor has decided not to seek ordination in the Catholic Church does not necessarily mean that its present situation has ceased to be an interim arrangement, though it undoubtedly will take longer to resolve that interim arrangement into something permanent. It seems likely that the ordinary and his Vicar for Clergy will attempt to identify another candidate to serve as pastor or chaplain of that congregation in due course.

      And third, the “social bond” of a community of faith is an imperative for the very sort of collaboration that’s necessary for effective evangelical outreach. People who know each other, and who know each others’ talents, know to whom to turn to get the job done. People who don’t know each other are on their own.

      Norm.

  2. The community that worships exclusively with a local Latin Rite parish is Our Lady of the Sign, Fredericton Junction, New Brunswick. Their former Anglican priest *is* seeking ordination, and we await the outcome of that decision, which will have a bearing on the future of this community, but it wouldn’t be appropriate to comment further at the present time.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Fr. Kenyon,

      You wrote: The community that worships exclusively with a local Latin Rite parish is Our Lady of the Sign, Fredericton Junction, New Brunswick. Their former Anglican priest *is* seeking ordination, and we await the outcome of that decision, which will have a bearing on the future of this community…

      Thank you for that clarification. Like EPMS, I had seen contrary statements on the Internet. I pray that his ordination will gain approval sooner rather than later.

      Norm.

  3. EPMS says:

    Although there are Ordinariate groups in the UK which used the OF when they were Anglicans, the Canadian group consists of former ACCC members who used the Canadian BCP. Initially their former rector was pursuing ordination, so of course the Ordinariate route made sense. Now they are a group of newly received Catholics happily worshipping in their local Catholic church with their fellow local Catholics. Of course the “social bond” is part of effective evangelism, but in this instance it would be the same sort of effective evangelism any Catholic would participate in: no Anglican Patrimony about it. As to a future postulant, a glance at the group photo at their reception will rule out that possibility, I think. Fr Ousley apparently celebrated an Ordinariate Rite mass there some months ago, according to Foolishness to the World, but despite my request for a report or pictures there was no response, which suggests it was No Big Deal. Which is fine. The Ordinariate is a means to an end, not an end in itself. But while these people may have joined the Catholic church as a result of the ACCC response to AC they have now taken a different direction, and it seems inaccurate to regard this as an Ordinariate community.

    • EPMS,

      Please note Fr. Kenyon’s comments. Are you actually talking about the same community? If you are, then Fr. Lee’s explanation should suffice.

      I have one comment of a more general nature which I should like to make, EPMS. Many of your recent comments lead me to believe that you have a very parochial view of the Ordinariate(s). If a group of former Anglicans is happily integrated into the local diocesan worshipping community, then you seem to believe that there is no need for them to have an Ordinariate identity, that the Ordinariate is superfluous in their case. Logically this would also apply to lone Anglicans or former Anglicans (like myself) living a fully integrated life in their diocesan parish – what do they want of the Ordinariate and what can the Ordinariate offer them?

      However, I myself believe that the Ordinariate movement (yes, I like to think of it as such) has a significant role to play in the wider Church as well as between the churches which goes far beyond the local community. Belonging to the Ordinariate, even if one is unable to share in the bonding very often or to participate in Ordinariate liturgy much more than once or twice a year, is fundamentally important for the development of the understanding among cradle Catholics of what receptive ecumenism is, is a significant and much-needed sign of solidarity with the Ordinariate groups and, like the mustard seed, has potential to grow into an unexpectedly large tree. Observing and, where possible, participating in this dynamic work of renewal of the Catholic Church and of its opening towards Anglicanism, and potentially towards other churches of the Reformation, also bring the individual enormous spiritual benefits, to which I personally can bear witness.

      I found Msgr Entwistle’s words in his recent call to Ordinariate supporters noteworthy:

      “I am asking each Supporter (he could have said “each lone Ordinariate member” or “each small Ordinariate group with little Ordinariate identity as yet” – Ed) to become an Ordinariate ambassador. Tell people about the Ordinariate. Help us to spread the word. Have a collection of flyers on hand and give them to people who might be interested, and if appropriate talk to your parish priest about whether you can leave some flyers in the Church. I am also asking that whenever we have special events, the Supporters support those events as best they are able to.”

      He could have encouraged them to join social networks, organise meetings between themselves where practical, develop house groups, bible study or catechesis meetings where there is a small group, regularly read or contribute to official and independent Ordinariate websites and publications, etc. etc.

      David Murphy

  4. EPMS says:

    Yes, I am talking about the same community. Last I heard, the former rector was not seeking ordination, “for prudential reasons,” so the fact that this is no longer the case changes things, of course. But the larger question, whether every former Anglican now a Catholic should be an Ordinariate supporter, remains. You, Mr Murphy, are clearly passionately committed and I respect all you are doing to make your committment tangible. But I cannot muster the same faith in Pope Benedict’s vision of a template for evangelising Protestants, if indeed that was his first thought in the matter. Personally I think he was genuinely convinced that tens or hundreds of thousands of Anglicans were standing by waiting to contribute higher standards of liturgy, music etc to the Latin Rite. But we do not need to debate this in a theoretical way, for we shall indeed SEE if this is a mustard seed or not.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: Last I heard, the former rector was not seeking ordination, “for prudential reasons,” so the fact that this is no longer the case changes things, of course.

      The Internet is often a source of misinformation!

      You wrote: But I cannot muster the same faith in Pope Benedict’s vision of a template for evangelising Protestants…

      Hunh?

      To “evangelize” means to infuse with the gospel (evangelium). Most Protestant Christians are far more infused with the gospel than a majority of Catholic Christians, as they turn consistently to the Word of God as the center and summit of their spiritual lives. If only cradle more Catholics would do so!

      You wrote: Personally I think he was genuinely convinced that tens or hundreds of thousands of Anglicans were standing by waiting to contribute higher standards of liturgy, music etc to the Latin Rite.

      I doubt that he had any delusions about either the numbers or the reality that many members of the groups that were knocking at the door would fall away.

      Having said that, the Vatican is not going to let the ordinariates fail because their failure would be a disaster for ecumenism. Rather, they are a prototype for reconciliation of many Protestant denominations.

      Norm.

  5. EPMS says:

    I used the phrase “evangelising Protestants” because I knew the verb “converting” would raise Norm’s hackles. So we can go with “reconciling”. The point is, as Norm says, AC is touted as a prototype for this activity, despite the fact that for most Protestant denominations, distinctive liturgy is not the patrimony they would bring to the Church. I completely fail to see “groups of Presbyterians” or “groups of Baptists” emerging from the Ordinariate experience. Did Pope Benedict foresee that the Ordinariates would initially attract the current numbers? Impossible to know. I do believe that their ultimate success or failure is not in the hands of the Vatican.

    • Personally I do not believe that ecumenism is in General envisaged as involving reception into the Catholic Church in groups with a specific patrimony. This was also not the original goal for Anglicans, but rather the establishment of a fundamental theological consensus and then entry of both autonomous churches into a mutual communion.

      Anglicanorum Coetibus was an emergency solution – the only possibility that the Vatican saw of establishing communion with a breakaway Anglican Group. It is not the “conversion” or “reconciliation” which is the prophetic gesture but the Union and the mutual recognition of important faith histories and sharing of patrimonies.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        David,

        You wrote: Personally I do not believe that ecumenism is in General envisaged as involving reception into the Catholic Church in groups with a specific patrimony. This was also not the original goal for Anglicans, but rather the establishment of a fundamental theological consensus and then entry of both autonomous churches into a mutual communion.

        Certainly that’s the view of many Protestants, as it’s descriptive of denominations that don’t have a formal hierarchy. The only communion to which the Catholic Church is a party, however, is a communion of those who are subject to papal authority. There is clear Catholic precedent of reconciliation with various groups that retained their own worship, most of which became sui juris ritual churches with patriarchs or major archbishops subject to the Roman pontiff. More recently, the reconciliation of (1) former members of the Society of St. Pius X (SSPX) to form the Fraternal Society of St. Peter (FSSP) and (2) the former Sacerdotal Society of St. John Mary Vianney to constitute the present Personal Apostolic Administration of St. John Mary Vianney followed a similar model: both entities are now subject to the Roman pontiff.

        You wrote: Anglicanorum Coetibus was an emergency solution – the only possibility that the Vatican saw of establishing communion with a breakaway Anglican Group.

        I’m not persuaded that “emergency solution” is a fair characterization. Rather, Anglicanorum coetibus was crafted very carefully and deliberately to accommodate a particular situation of Anglican Christians and clergy who asked to come into the full communion of the Catholic Church in significant numbers and to retain elements of their patrimony without crossing other ecumenical relations. The particular difficulty posed by these now former Anglicans is that most of their clergy, including their bishops, were married. The Vatican was concerned that ordination of married men to episcopal office would cross the norms of the Orthodox Communion, which maintains a celibate episcopacy, and thus sought an alternative. Note that <a href="http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P1C.HTMCanons 368-374 of the Codex Juris Canonici (Code of Canon Law) already provided for particular churches governed by individuals who might not receive episcopal ordination: territorial prelatures, territorial abbacies, apostolic prefectures, apostolic vicariates, and apostolic administrations, all canonically equivalent to dioceses, have a longstanding existence. Also, ordinariates were far from unprecedented, having been erected to serve members of the armed forces of many countries. Anglicanorum coetibus simply adapted this precedent to a new situation.

        You wrote: It is not the “conversion” or “reconciliation” which is the prophetic gesture but the Union and the mutual recognition of important faith histories and sharing of patrimonies.

        It is also the willingness to afford that patrimony its own stable place and its own hierarchy within the Catholic Church.

        Norm.

  6. EPMS says:

    By “breakaway Anglican Group” do you mean TAC? That would certainly bolster the idea that hundreds of thousands were expected to join, if we assume that the TAC membership figures being floated at the time were taken at face value. I thought the consensus now was that the original impetus came from a group of seven(?) CofE bishops who approached the Vatican prior to the TAC letter. John Bruce also has an apparently well-documented story about a plan brought forward to the Pastoral Provision office in the US by the Episcopalian bishop Clarence Pope and his theological advisor, Wayne Hankey, similar in scope to the Ordinariate structure of AC. Neither of these initiatives involved breakaway groups.

  7. William Tighe says:

    “a group of seven(?) CofE bishops who approached the Vatican prior to the TAC letter”

    I understand that there were nine, although some of them may have been involved in the scheme as part of the maneuvering within the Church of England over provision for “conservatives” rather than from any interest in the Roman Option.

    “a plan brought forward to the Pastoral Provision office in the US by the Episcopalian bishop Clarence Pope and his theological advisor, Wayne Hankey, similar in scope to the Ordinariate structure of AC”

    Yes, and in their meetings with Vatican officials ca. 1996-97 they claimed that a quarter-million American Anglicans would come with them into the Catholic Church via such a structure.

  8. EPMS says:

    Prof Tighe, after I mentioned John Bruce I recalled that you gave an extensive paper on the origins of AC which was reproduced, or perhaps simply summarised, on the Anglo-Catholic blog. So thank you for confirming the details.

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