Mgr Robert Mercer on Ordinariate priestly training in the UK

Monsignor Robert Mercer CR wrote the following for “Update”, the newsletter of the Sodality of St. Edmund, King and Martyr, in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada:

POT

No, not weed but post ordination training, or pre ordination training, come to that.

It occurs to me that members of St Edmund’s in Kitchener-Waterloo, or other Canadians of the North American Ordinariate, might be interested in a difference between their circumstances and those of the UK. Difference has been occasioned not by theology or liturgy but by geography.

Former Anglican clergy being received into communion with the Bishop of Rome and the millions of others also in communion with him, are expected to do some study, properly enough I learn that in North America such clergy have devoted Saturdays to study, that by means of computers they have been in contact with tutors in Houston, Texas, and with one another. Opinions are heard, points of view are shared. A technophobe like me is grateful to have escaped such technology. My mind boggles. And I wonder how sore eyes become or how dizzy heads become.

The United Kingdom is small enough for clergy to meet in person. We make new friends, swap experiences, share a good meal, celebrate the eucharist together, enjoy a day out. There is much laughter. Some of us are even close enough to get to venues with relative ease. In my own intake, year No 2, a group of 20, one man comes from a Scottish island, another from rural Wales, and a third from North East England. For them travel is more exacting. My group also includes an Irishman, a Japanese and and an American. The last belonged not to the TAC but to another jurisdiction, the Anglican Province of America. He came to England as a padre in the US air force and was received into the Ordinariate over here. Sadly, a member of my group who did belong to the TAC, Fr Philip Penfold, died only days after his priesting. He was battling cancer throughout the course of studies but managed to get to London from the South Coast for every study day. The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in Rome and the Bishop of Arundel & Brighton kindly brought Philip’s ordination forward.

Fr. Philip Penfold RIP with Fr. Neil Chatfield and Mgr. Robert Mercer CR at Fr. Philip's Ordination

Fr. Philip Penfold RIP with Fr. Neil Chatfield and Mgr. Robert Mercer CR at Fr. Philip’s Ordination

The first intake, year No 1, was a large one of 60 members. They were given a choice of venues most accessible to them, Buckfast Abbey in the West country, Birmingham in the Midlands or London. They have now completed their two and a half year course, whereas my lot carry on until June this year.

Intake No. 4 began this past January.

In addition to study days we also have a few plenary sessions for all clergy whatever intake they belong to. There are now almost 100 of us. We gather in the handsome basement of a recently refurbished Catholic church in Soho Square, called St Patrick’s. A plenary is not unlike one of those regional deanery meetings we used to hold in the TAC, Canada. Remember them? Elevenses, a square meal at midday, afternoon tea; worship, an erudite lecture from a learned person; a “business” session.

The treasurer, a layman from the Midlands, says we don’t have enough money, that we must increase income or decrease expenses. How Anglican can you get? This is patrimony for sure. But it’s encouraging to learn that Pope Benedict made a handsome donation from his own discretionary fund, that a group of supporters assist us, Friends of the Ordinariate. Their patrons include a duke and one of the Queen’s cousins.

The clergy are in differing situations, so there are pastoral practicalities to compare. One Ordinariate priest has been appointed parish priest of a conventional RC parish which is without a single Ordinariate layman, so he has new ropes to learn, but this arrangement means that paying him and housing him is no problem. Another Ordinariate priest and his sixty Ordinariate parishioners camp out in a Catholic parish which gets two thousand
communicants a Sunday, so this man offers some assistance to his hosts. But how is he to be paid?

We at St Agatha’s in Portsmouth own our own building so we are in quite different circumstances. Diocesan Roman Catholics are beginning to trickle over to us, either because they prefer a smaller and more family like congregation, or else because they prefer Anglican style worship. The RC cathedral of St John the Evangelist is only 600 yards away from St Agatha’s so worshippers get a choice.

Another event all clergy attend is our Chrism Mass in Holy Week. As our Ordinary, Monsignor Keith Newton, is not in bishop’s orders, the Pope’s Nuncio to the UK, Archbishop Mennini, acts on the Ordinary’s behalf: he consecrates the oils for anointing the sick and for those to be confirmed (chrismated) or ordained. This service can now take place in our small “cathedral”, as it were, the Church of the Assumption, also in Soho, formerly the domestic chapel of the Portuguese embassy and then of the Bavarian embassy.

Then there is the occasional central evensong or Epiphany carol service, impeccably Anglican with Prayer Book psalms to Anglican chant and hymns from the green English Hymnal. And we have been able to make a silent retreat together at Douai Abbey which seems to be nowhere in particular and difficult to get to if you don’t have a car.

Father and Mrs Newton now have an official residence behind the Assumption church, with rather too many storeys for some knees but with rooms large enough for many study groups to meet in. Formerly the London venue was Allen Hall, the Catholic seminary in Chelsea, almost on the banks of the Thames. This is on the site of St Sir Thomas More’s house where King Henry VIII used to meet him, perhaps under the very mulberry tree which still grows and fruits there. We received the warmest of welcomes from seminarians and staff. The lads nicknamed us Dad’s Army and Father Newton they called Captain Mainwaring. (Are Canadians still familiar with this TV series about Britain’ s Home Guard during the Second World War?) Once when we had finished a semester there we concluded it with a garden party complete with wine and a dessert called Eton mess, a concoction of strawberries and meringue.

Our lecturers included layfolk as well as clergy, women as well as men, Dr Caroline Farey on philosophy (who had been a consultant to a synod of bishops in Rome), Dr Clare Watkins on doctrine, and a witty and very Scots nun on canon law. The lecturer who got a standing ovation was the missionary who spoke about the Bible. Once every two months we submit an essay of two thousand words. The markers are theologians who are laymen, though on account of our grey hairs they don’t actually award marks like gamma minus; they merely write comments in the margins. The man who co-ordinates all this is the learned Dr Stephen Wang, senior Catholic chaplain in the university of London.

In short, I am happy to report that our Brit experience is good.

Monsignor Robert Mercer CR

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27 Responses to Mgr Robert Mercer on Ordinariate priestly training in the UK

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    David,

    You wrote: Monsignor Robert Mercer CR wrote the following for “Update”, the newsletter of the Sodality of St. Edmund, King and Martyr, in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada…

    Thank you for reposting this article. There is much of significance in it of which I was not fully aware. The remaining quotations are from Msgr. Mercer’s article.

    Intake No. 4 began this past January.

    I was not previously aware that there had been an “Intake No. 3” and an “Intake No. 4,” but it appears that an “intake” is basically an annual event in the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham (OOLW).

    … my own intake, year No 2, a group of 20…

    The first intake, year No 1, was a large one of 60 members….

    In addition to study days we also have a few plenary sessions for all clergy whatever intake they belong to. There are now almost 100 of us.

    It’s not really surprising that the first intake was the largest, but it’s encouraging that intakes apparently are continuing to be in double digits.

    Of course, another large intake is bound to happen whenever conditions make the Church of England less hospitable for her more orthodox members — and this could include Evangelical members as well as Anglo-Catholic members.

    The RC cathedral of St John the Evangelist is only 600 yards away from St Agatha’s so worshippers get a choice.

    Yes, and the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist is truly magnificent! I had the privilege of assisting in the celebration of mass there while a liaison officer attached to Headquarters, Second Marines, embarked aboard USS Saipan (LHA-2) when she ported in “Ol’ Pompey” three times in conjunction with a NATO exercise called Teamwork ’84.

    My group also includes an Irishman, a Japanese and and an American. The last belonged not to the TAC but to another jurisdiction, the Anglican Province of America. He came to England as a padre in the US air force and was received into the Ordinariate over here.

    This is a very interesting tidbit, indeed!

    Norm.

    • EPMS says:

      It occurs to me, speaking of recent “intakes” of clergy, that they seem no longer to be arriving with groups. I have read of the recent reception or ordination of a number of former Cof E clergy in the last few months who were in active ministry just prior, but none of them brought any members of their former parish with them. Did they try? When the OOLW was first erected it seemed that many parishes went through a period of discernment with their rector, catechesis was offered, and most or some of the congregation entered with him. Now we seem to be back ito the pattern where a clergyman, having come to the conclusion that he wishes to become a Catholic, announces his departure and leaves, solo. This is good for the UK Church, which is now highly dependant on the CofE as a source of priests (10%, as I have noted elsewhere), but is not really in the spirit of AC.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        EPMS,

        You wrote: This is good for the UK Church, which is now highly dependant on the CofE as a source of priests (10%, as I have noted elsewhere), but is not really in the spirit of AC.

        I don’t agree with your assertion that reception of clergy who come without congregations is not really in the spirit of the apostolic constitution Anglicanorum coetibus. The apostolic constitution says nothing about how people come into the Catholic Church, though it clearly does anticipate that some whole parishes may come as groups. There is nothing in it anywhere that mentions former Anglican clerics coming with congregations or that suggests that anybody should not come individually.

        It is true that the formative stage requires a critical mass to form congregations that will use their own version of the liturgy — and this is also true for an ordinariate to establish a meaningful presence in a new place. One or two people, ordained or not, cannot readily do this. But once there’s critical mass to form a community, it can receive additional members with no problem. And likewise, once the ordinariate has a critical mass of clergy to staff its parishes, it can receive and ordain additional former Anglican clergy with no problem whatsoever.

        In this regard, the ordinariates also need to look seriously at the model presented by the community of St. Thomas More Church in Toronto. This is a community cobbled together of former Anglicans who came individually from various Anglican congregations throughout the local area, led by a former Anglican cleric who came without a congregation, and it seems to be thriving! I can’t believe that Toronto is the only major city where there is a significant number of Anglican Christians knocking individually on the doors of local Catholic parishes.

        Norm.

      • And I am still not giving up on the idea of trying to win over some (or hopefully even many) of those thousands of former Anglicans who swam the Tiber before AC. As yet, like you EPMS, they don’t see the point, I imagine. They don’t recognise that the Ordinariates are not merely a comfortable, not painful means of reception into the Catholic Church, but rather a spiritual movement, an ecumenical project with a specific mission which it is well worth participating in.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        David,

        You wrote: As yet, like you EPMS, they don’t see the point, I imagine. They don’t recognise that the Ordinariates are not merely a comfortable, not painful means of reception into the Catholic Church, but rather a spiritual movement, an ecumenical project with a specific mission which it is well worth participating in.

        I rather suspect that the overwhelming majority are completely unaware of the ordinariates as yet, even if they happen to be in the vicinity of an ordinariate congregation. Most diocesan pastors probably are not exactly eager to spread the word, as they fear losing parishioners — and especially parishioners who donate generously.

        Norm.

  2. EPMS says:

    I have some difficulty with Ordinariate military chaplains. Presumably their opportunity to celebrate the Ordinariate rite is zero, and their association with potential Ordinariate members close thereto. What is the point?

    • Conchúr says:

      Fr Watts hasn’t been a member of USAF since 2011. He was never a military chaplain for OOLW.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You asked: I have some difficulty with Ordinariate military chaplains. Presumably their opportunity to celebrate the Ordinariate rite is zero, and their association with potential Ordinariate members close thereto. What is the point?

      Do ordinariate clergy exist only to celebrate the ordinariate liturgy, or should the ordinariates contribute to the greater good of the whole church?

      I think the latter, and thus expect that ordinariate clergy should be represented on a proportionate basis among Catholic chaplains in the armed forces, in the same manner as clergy of the sui juris ritual churches. (Note that clergy of the sui juris ritual churches who enter the armed forces as chaplains first receive faculties to celebrate according to the ordinary form of the Roman Rite.) And while it is true that they will celebrate according to the ordinary form of the Roman Rite most of the time, they nevertheless retain their faculty to celebrate according to the Book of Divine Worship whenever it is appropriate to do so. This could include “masses without a congregation” on weekdays (on my ship, the Catholic chaplain celebrated such a mass in his cabin at lunchtime when there was no mass scheduled in the plan of the day) or masses with a handful of ordinariate members with whom they might come into contact.

      As far as the ordinariates are concerned, the service of their clergy as chaplains of the armed forces represents a phenomenal opportunity to gain visibility among the larger Catholic population. Chaplains of the armed forces come into contact with a lot more Catholics during an assignment to a particular unit or post than a typical diocesan priest assigned to parish ministry simply because the armed forces rotate personnel relatively frequently, and they also have much closer contact with those whom they serve. There are few other ministries that would gain so much visibility for an ordinariate in such a short window of time.

      There’s also the reality that all Christian chaplains in the armed forces must serve Christians of all denominations because many units and posts are too small to have more than one chaplain. A chaplain from the ordinariate is likely to get to know a significant number of members of the province of the Anglican Communion of the respective country. The explanation that “we are Catholic, but we use the Anglican form of the liturgy” is apt to bring some curiosity on their part, and ultimately lead to some asking to come into the Catholic Church as part of the respective ordinariate.

      It’s also important to note that the clergy of the Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter (OCSP) who are currently serving as chaplains in the armed forces were serving as Episcopal chaplains in the armed forces before they came into the Catholic Church and the OCSP. The U. S. Government pays their salaries as officers of the armed forces, and will provide “retirement pay” when they retire from active duty. Thus, the OCSP does not have to worry about paying these members of its clergy.

      I really don’t see any down side to this. Rather, everybody seems to win.

      Norm.

  3. EPMS says:

    Why did the former Episcopal chaplains not enter through the Pastoral Provision? That is supposed to be the route in the US for former clergy who do not bring a group with them.

    • Oh, EPMS, you are still of the opinion that Ordinariate members must be in groups.

      TWICE during his talk on Saturday last, Cardinal Nichols spoke of people entering the Ordinariate “corporately or individually”, “in groups or as individuals”!

      It is important for Msgr. Steenson to have “lone” Ordinariate priests at least as a reserve pool. How could he otherwise provide for communities whose pastors die or retire (Flushing, Rochester)?

      • EPMS says:

        I note that Fr Ken R. Bolin, an OCSP military chaplain, will be celebrating an Ordinariate rite mass four times a year for the Anglican Ordinariate Society (of the Ozarks) in Springfield MO. Since 2011 they have met once a month for Evening Prayer, but this month the first mass was celebrated for a group of about two dozen, according to the website. So this will give Fr Bolin an opportunity to function in an Ordinariate context, albeit not frequently.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You asked: Why did the former Episcopal chaplains not enter through the Pastoral Provision? That is supposed to be the route in the US for former clergy who do not bring a group with them.

      The Vatican’s policy is that former Anglican clergy in the United States may apply for ordination in the Catholic Church either through the so-called “pastoral provision” of 1980 or through the ordinariate. It is each cleric’s personal choice. Some bishops apparently are applying pressure for candidates in their dioceses who do not have congregations to enter through the so-called “pastoral provision,” but this is not a universal norm by any means.

      The Archdiocese for the Military Services here in the States is rather unusual, in that the only clergy actually incardinated into it are its bishops. The chaplains in the armed forces are essentially on loan from the dioceses and religious orders to which they belong while they have status as chaplains in the respective services. It really does not matter to the Archdiocese for the Military Services whether a chaplain is incardinated into a diocese or the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter, since the chaplain is “on loan” either way.

      Norm.

  4. EPMS says:

    My interpretation of Cardinal Nichols’ statements is that a lay person may come as part of a group, or, as an individual, enter an existing group. But only Cardinal Nichols can confirm or deny. For your second point, I doubt that the “lone” Ordinariate priests in the OCSP would be able to relocate to fill vacancies arising, given that OCSP has few resources to assist them. It was only a fluke that there was an otherwise unassigned Spanish-speaking Ordinariate priest in the NYC area when the Flushing group became leaderless. The OCSP parish in Oceanside CA is looking for a new pastor. Will Ordinariate priest Fr Seraiah, ordained without a group and currently working as a diocesan priest in Iowa, be available? Fr Gipson, ordained without a group and now one of five clergy at the OCSP parish in Houston? I do not of course know that the answer is “No”; I am just pointing out that when a quasi-diocese takes in an entire continent the “reserve pool” concept is complicated.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You said: For your second point, I doubt that the “lone” Ordinariate priests in the OCSP would be able to relocate to fill vacancies arising, given that OCSP has few resources to assist them.

      Are you aware that some ordinariate clergy already have relocated?

      >> Fr. Charles Hough IV relocated to Houston to assume the position of rector of the ordinariate’s principal church.

      >> Fr. Carl Reid relocated to Victoria to assist the congregation there.

      You said: It was only a fluke that there was an otherwise unassigned Spanish-speaking Ordinariate priest in the NYC area when the Flushing group became leaderless.

      Yes, and I’m not sure that Msgr. Steenson has appointed him as that group’s new pastor or chaplain as yet. The indication was that he would consider his options a bit more deliberately.

      You said: The OCSP parish in Oceanside CA is looking for a new pastor.

      Yes, as is the group in Rochester, New York.

      You said: Will Ordinariate priest Fr Seraiah, ordained without a group and currently working as a diocesan priest in Iowa, be available? Fr Gipson, ordained without a group and now one of five clergy at the OCSP parish in Houston? I do not of course know that the answer is “No”; I am just pointing out that when a quasi-diocese takes in an entire continent the “reserve pool” concept is complicated.

      Yes, there are issues in transferring married clergy that don’t exist in the case of celibate clergy — the ability of a cleric’s wife to transfer or to find employment in a new location, the potentially disruptive effect on schooling of children or on medical care of a family member with cancer or some other disease, etc. — that may limit the viable options, but there are ways to address these issues.

      But note that Fr. Seraiah reports only the ordinary in terms of assignment. The bishop of the local diocese cannot block his transfer. Of course, an ordinary who wants to maintain positive relations will work with the local bishop to coordinate the timing of a transfer to minimize disruption.

      Norm.

  5. EPMS says:

    There is also the fact that, say, Iowa pays a stipend and Rochester and Oceanside cannot. I note that in the OOLW a new so-called Ordinariate priest is in a diocesan parish with “not a single Ordinariate parishioner” because he needs a stipend and a house. And I am sure he is not unique. There are others in the OOLW who are responsible for diocesan parishes and also for distant Ordinariate groups for similar reasons. There seems to be no expectation that a potential OOLW clergyman will bring a group, and consequently the ratio of priests to laity is now about 1 to 10 or 20. The OCSP, however, is in (friendly) competition with the Pastoral Provision for former clergy. I think that as older OCSP clergy cease functioning or relocate to warmer climes it will be hard to replace them in Ordinariate communities which cannot offer any financial support. Fr Reid relocated to Victoria, the Florida of Canada, in his home province. Rochester is going to be a tougher sell.

  6. EPMS says:

    Norm, regarding your message of October 5, 5:32 pm, St Thomas More Toronto is, as you say, a gathered group, although more than half its original membership came from one Anglican parish, although they left it many years ago. The current pastor is related by marriage to a number of these people. Perhaps thirty years ago the former rector of that parish tried unsuccessfully to have a Pastoral Provision Anglican Use parish erected in Toronto. So it is not entirely a start-up operation. In any event, I am not sure how it is relevant to the larger question of whether priests leaving the Anglican/Episcopal church are still trying to bring parishioners with them, or whether they are just getting up in the pulpit and saying good-bye, as in the past. Fr Hodgins of St Thomas More was the chaplain at an Anglican private boys’ school so not in a position to do much proselytising ahead of his departure.

    • You are, of course, right EPMS, that the number of whole groups entering the Church via the Ordinariates has hit a low point, and your question as to whether priests are trying to encourage their parishioners to come with them is a valid one. However, I do know of examples in the UK where priests were hopeful until the last that they would be accompanied but where the lay faithful backed down at the last hurdle.

      Perhaps Msgr Entwistle’s idea of Ordinariate planting is worth exploring – i.e. seconding a solitary priest to a diocesan parish in an area where one has strategically identified great potential for attracting former or current Anglicans and then providing Ordinariate liturgy and other activities in a spirit of hope.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: In any event, I am not sure how it is relevant to the larger question of whether priests leaving the Anglican/Episcopal church are still trying to bring parishioners with them, or whether they are just getting up in the pulpit and saying good-bye, as in the past.

      My point was that there is more than one way to skin a cat. Most ordinariate congregations began as congregations that came into the Catholic Church from either the respective province of the Anglican Communion or a “continuing Anglican” body essentially intact. The relevance here is that this community did not. Rather, the bishop of the local diocese brought these people together and formed a congregation where one did not previously exist. There must be more opportunities to do likewise.

      You wrote: Fr Hodgins of St Thomas More was the chaplain at an Anglican private boys’ school so not in a position to do much proselytising ahead of his departure.

      The reason why he came without a congregation is not relevant. The fact is that he was available to assume pastoral leadership where he was needed.

      Norm.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: … not in a position to do much proselytizing ahead of his departure. (boldface added)

      Another thought: Don’t you think it’s rather duplicitous and deceitful for a cleric to proselytize people to leave the denomination that’s paying his salary?

      And is a person who is that duplicitous, deceitful, and self-serving the sort of person whom we want to ordain into the ranks of Catholic clergy?

      I rather think not.

      The reality is that the clergy who are coming into the Catholic Church with their congregations are clergy whose congregations were already dissatisfied with the direction of their provinces of the Anglican Communion and thus in the process of discerning their options, and whose Anglican bishops had already been informed of the situation. It is thus a cleric choosing to go with his congregation rather than a cleric recruiting his congregation to go with him.

      Norm.

      • EPMS says:

        In the case of a “Continuing” Anglican congregation you are right, Norm these people had already expressed their dissatisfaction with the mainstream Anglican Communion. Whether they were also dissatisfied with the “Catholic Anglican Church in North America” or whatever body they belonged to is another matter. I think that whether a congregation left one of these organisations when the OCSP was erected was very much dependant on the “salesmanship”, in the best sense, of the rector. But in the case of St John the Evangelist, Calgary, or the TEC and Cof E parishes that came largely intact, I do not think that there is any evidence that they were thinking of going anywhere until AC was mooted and their respective rectors or vicars pitched the idea. As we know, the “Continuing” movement didn’t draw flies in the UK, so there was certainly nothing there for the OOLW to tap into. Calgary had not one but two ACCC parishes, but St John’s remained in the ACC until Fr Kenyon’s arrival. Do we think that the forty or fifty former parishioners of San Jorge Episcopal, Flushing, were on the verge of departing TEC anyway before Fr Contreras came along? Are there any instances where most of a parish left for the Ordinariate but the rector stayed behind? I very much doubt it.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        EPMS,

        You wrote: In the case of a “Continuing” Anglican congregation you are right, Norm these people had already expressed their dissatisfaction with the mainstream Anglican Communion. Whether they were also dissatisfied with the “Catholic Anglican Church in North America” or whatever body they belonged to is another matter. I think that whether a congregation left one of these organisations when the OCSP was erected was very much dependant on the “salesmanship”, in the best sense, of the rector. But in the case of St John the Evangelist, Calgary, or the TEC and Cof E parishes that came largely intact, I do not think that there is any evidence that they were thinking of going anywhere until AC was mooted and their respective rectors or vicars pitched the idea.

        I rather think that my comments actually are more true of the congregations that came, and are coming, directly from the respective provinces of the Anglican Communion than of the congregations coming from various “continuing Anglican” bodies. Many of the congregations that come directly from the respective provinces of the Anglican Communion have long been dissatisfied with the “reforms” that have occurred therein, but did not perceive the various “continuing Anglican” bodies to be viable alternatives, and thus were biding their time until another option became available. The establishment of the respective ordinariates within the Catholic Church provided that opportunity.

        Where salesmanship was necessary, rather, was in the Traditional Anglican Communion. There, the bishops made a commitment to come into the Catholic Church, and had to sell it to their clergy and, through their clergy, to their parishioners. Obviously, some of their clergy and parishioners bought it and some did not.

        BTW, you really need to keep your organizations straight. The Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) is a group of orthodox Anglicans who seek to remain in the Anglican Communion. The provinces of the Global Anglican Futures Conference (GAFCON) and its Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans (FCA), which remain part of the Anglican Communion, recognize them, but the Archbishop of Canterbury, to my knowledge, has not yet done so. Thus, they are in some sense in limbo, but I don’t think that they fit neatly into the category of “continuing Anglican” bodies that have terminated their affiliation with the Anglican Communion completely.

        Norm.

  7. EPMS says:

    Norm, I made up the CACNA name to cover the whole “Continuing” alphabet soup. As for the answers to the questions in my last paragraph, I guess ultimately neither of us can do more than speculate. Perhaps someday we will hear the stories from the horse’s mouth. Or another mainstream ACC or TEC parish will join the OCSP and we will get more context.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: Perhaps someday we will hear the stories from the horse’s mouth. Or another mainstream ACC or TEC parish will join the OCSP and we will get more context.

      If you want to hear it “from the horse’s mouth,” my recommendation would be to visit some of these communities and talk with their members during the coffee hour (“bun fight”) after their mass.

      But there are already several congregations that have come into the Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter (OCSP) directly from The Episcopal Church (TEC) here in the States: St. Gregory the Great, Stoneham, MA (formerly Beverly, MA), St. Michael the Archangel, Philadelphia, St. Luke’s Church, Washington, DC (formerly Bladensburg, MD), St. Timothy’s Church, Catonsville, MD, Christ the King Church, Towson, MD, Mount Calvary Church, Baltimore, MD, Corpus Christi Community, Charlston, SC, and St. Barnabas Parish, Omaha, NE appear to be in this category based on information on their web sites, without excluding the possibility that some of the other ordinariate congregations also may be in this category.

      More parishes of the Anglican Church in Canada (ACC) undoubtedly will come into the OCSP in due course. It’s just a question of when it will happen.

      Norm.

  8. EPMS says:

    Christ the King, Towson was a parish of the Charismatic Episcopal Church, and later of the ACA. Corpus Christi is a new community, never a part of TEC. St Barnabas, Omaha left TEC in 2007. St Gregory the Great is a new parish with a nucleus of parishioners from a local ACNA parish.

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