THIS is Anglican patrimony !

I don’t know if Pope Benedict realised just how many calories (and how much food-related fun) he was letting the Catholic Church in for when he permitted the Ordinariates to bring their Anglican patrimony with them.

The Darlington Ordinariate Group in Gainford is the UK’s front runner in the food stakes, but these photos of the preparations for today’s Dedication Feast at St. John the Evangelist in Calgary show that the Canadians too know how to promote this aspect of our patrimony.

St John Calgary dedication feast 2St John Calgary dedication feast 1St John Calgary dedication feast 3St John Calgary dedication feast 4I bet you can’t guess which UK Ordinariate group the St John’s pilgrims to England visited last year … GAINFORD !!

Here they are together:

Canadian guests at Gainford

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15 Responses to THIS is Anglican patrimony !

  1. EPMS says:

    And this is not : http://ordinariate.net/news/knights-of-columbus-find-a-new-home-in-the-ordinariate
    Not a criticism of the Knights of Columbus, but I am interested to see whether elements of Catholic parish practice which never made it into Anglo-Catholicism or even Anglo-Papalism will start to transform Ordinariate parishes into something closer to the mainstream. I would put “Divine Mercy Sunday” on this list.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: Not a criticism of the Knights of Columbus, but I am interested to see whether elements of Catholic parish practice which never made it into Anglo-Catholicism or even Anglo-Papalism will start to transform Ordinariate parishes into something closer to the mainstream. I would put “Divine Mercy Sunday” on this list.

      Clearly the Chaplet of Divine Mercy is a relatively novel popular devotion and the use of the title “Divine Mercy Sunday” ieseis developments happened precisely because authentic Christian faith is a living faith, and thus continues to grow in a manner consistent with divine revelation. It is not rational to expect that the Anglican patrimony within the ordinariates would somehow be frozen for all time, as that would cause it to cease to be a living tradition.

      Norm.

      • EPMS says:

        Since “patrimony” by definition is something inherited from one’s ancestors it is not living, unlike the Christian faith in general. Members of the Ordinariate are no longer Anglicans; anything they add to their parish life from the wider Church may enrich their community but it does not thereby become Anglican.

      • Nobody is suggesting that it does!

        BTW, current Anglican practice will naturally become part of the patrimony as time progesses, and we in the Ordinariate are called not only to bring the historical patrimony into the Catholic Church, but – ever new – to try to integrate into the wider Church what is compatible with the Catholic faith.

      • godfrey1099 says:

        The concept of the Ordinariates is about the EXCHANGE of gifts. Thus, while offering the elements of the Anglican Patrimony to the wider Catholic Church, the Ordinariate parishes can, and certainly will, adopt some new elements into their worship (e.g. related to some saints from beyond the English-speaking realm, e.g. St. Faustina, who seem to be “saints for our times”) . And why shouldn’t they, after all?
        The same happened in the past with the exchange of gifts between Eastern Catholic Churches and the Latin Church which took effect in the wake of unions.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        David,

        You wrote: … and we in the Ordinariate are called not only to bring the historical patrimony into the Catholic Church, but – ever new – to try to integrate into the wider Church what is compatible with the Catholic faith.

        Hmmm….

        The question is what you mean by the phrase “integrate into the wider Church” in this context. In one sense, that which exists within the ordinariates is inherently integrated into the wider church because the ordinariates are inherently part of the wider church. If on the other hand, I don’t expect to see Anglican patrimony will become mainstream within the Roman Catholic Church. For example, it is not likely that elements such as the Prayer of Humble Access or the Comfortable Words will appear in the next edition of the Roman Missal. Rather, the Anglican custom will continue to exist in its own jurisdictions alongside the extant Roman custom in the mainstream dioceses, just as various other rites continue to exist in the various sui juris ritual churches alongside the Roman Rite.

        Going forward, there is clear potential for a sui juris ritual church of the Anglican patrimony, but it probably won’t happen until the Church of England, or at least the See of Canterbury, returns to full communion because that see is the obvious see to be its major archbishopric due to its role as an “instrument of communion” for the Church of England and the broader Anglican Communion.

        Norm.

      • Briefly, the task of bringing elements of the Anglican liturgy into the wider Church has already been achieved (at least formally) with the promulgation of the “Divine Worship” liturgy, as you have rightly stated, but that is not the extent of the Anglican patrimony – just one example: restoring the spirituality of the missing centuries and even of pre-Reformation England to the Catholic Church in England is only just beginning.

  2. EPMS says:

    The Eastern Catholic Churches offer many distinct elements: their vestments, church furnishings, and music are quite different from those used in the Roman rite, the ordination of married men is the norm, and the liturgy is different and often not in a local vernacular. An Ordinariate mass, by contrast, offers a subtle variation on the Roman rite; if they are using the OF it is very subtle indeed. An admixture of new Catholic practices may add greatly to the life of the group but eventually may produce a parish culture that is to the “Anglican patrimony” as chop suey or General Tso’s chicken is to Chinese food as eaten anywhere in China.

    • godfrey1099 says:

      IMHO, you much exaggerate. Adding NEW elements will not diminish the existing ones, but simply enrich them. BTW, is Rosary also against the Anglican patrimony, in your opinion?
      As for historical examples, at one point Ukrainian Catholic Church incorporated the Corpus Christi procession from the Latin Church and it did not threaten their idenity. Such mutual enrichment is simply natural, inevitable and positive once the communion is re-established.

    • Here we go again!

      Please forgive me, EPMS, for not finding your gloom and defeatism helpful to the Ordinariate cause. I would much prefer you to make constructive suggestions as to how to avoid the fate which you see us drifting towards!

      David Murphy

      • EPMS says:

        Hmmm, what to say? I am tempted to say “Do not set up a Knights of Columbus chapter. If you must have a men’s group, do not have one involving feathered hats, dinner jackets, and swords.” There’s a reason its British counterpart a) confines its regalia to a modest neckband b) never really caught on (about 4,300 members, compared to 1.9 million in the Knights of Columbus). If you look at the history of the formation of the Knights of Columbus it was very much about overcoming nativist, anti-immigrant prejudice in the US. But if I said these things I would look like I am putting the knock on a very worthy organisation, or opening the can of worms about how separating service groups into all-men and all-women is not the way forward in the 21st C. Really, when the posts dry up on this blog, and I am scanning in vain for an account, say, of the reboot meeting of the Anglican Use/Anglicanorum Coetibus Society, I nevertheless have to comment on SOMETHING, and that’s when the trouble usually starts. Let us work together to keep me out of trouble.

  3. EPMS says:

    My reading of this summary of the articles of the Union of Brest http://holyeucharist.ca/about/union-of-brest/ Is that Article 7 explicitly states that Ukrainian Catholics will be not be required to participate in Corpus Christi processions “inasmuch as [their] use of the Mysteries is different”.

  4. EPMS says:

    Looking into this further, I see that the story of the “de-Latinization” of the Eastern Rite churches after Vatican II is quite a fascinating one.

  5. godfrey1099 says:

    As for the article from the CSP Ordinariate website linked by EPMS first above (http://ordinariate.net/news/knights-of-columbus-find-a-new-home-in-the-ordinariate), the Incarnation Church in Orlando seems like yet another great success story: less than 200 people were originally received into the Ordinariate in 2012 and now they are “fast approaching the 100-family mark” (i.e. about 400 people).

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