The Portal – March 2015

This month’s The Portal can be accessed by clicking on the front page photo below and then following the links to “Read The Portal”. Happy reading!

The Portal - March 2015

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6 Responses to The Portal – March 2015

  1. EPMS says:

    It is very interesting to compare the update on the Northampton Ordinariate Group in this issue with the original account in the March 2014 issue (not 2013, as erroneously stated in this month’s article). A year ago the NOG had 12 laypeople and three priests; not really an efficient deployment of resources in the context of the Church as a whole. Now their clergy enable a different local parish to continue offering a Vigil mass, which is attended by about a hundred, although the number of Ordinariate or Ordinariate-eligible attendees seems to have remained very low ( three were identified on the occasion of this visit). Once a month the Vigil mass is celebrated according to the Ordinariate Rite, thus exposing it to a far wider audience than it had previously. Should we regard this as growth?

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: Now their clergy enable a different local parish to continue offering a Vigil mass, which is attended by about a hundred, although the number of Ordinariate or Ordinariate-eligible attendees seems to have remained very low ( three were identified on the occasion of this visit). Once a month the Vigil mass is celebrated according to the Ordinariate Rite, thus exposing it to a far wider audience than it had previously. Should we regard this as growth?

      Clearly not.

      Of course, it is (1) exposing a much larger group to the ordinariate and to the mass of Divine Worship and thus (2) raising awareness thereof, thereby creating significant potential where it did not previously exist for possible growth in the future. As such, it may turn out to be a major turning point in the life of this ordinariate congregation when viewed from a historical perspective.

      What is particularly significant is that the mass apparently seems to be serving people of nearby parishes that have dropped their own vigil masses due to the declining number of clergy in the local diocese. As word spreads, it seems likely that any former Anglicans who now belong to those parishes may find their way and that any Anglicans who knock at the doors of those parishes seeking to explore reception into the Catholic Church will hear about the ordinariate community.

      Having said that, I think the recent episcopal ordinations in the Church of England may well be the item that will have a more profound impact on the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham. It’s only a matter of time until so-called “Anglo-Catholics” in the Church of England figure out that the current arrangement is not workable for the long term. Once that happens, they will come knocking on doors.

      Norm.

      • EPMS says:

        The article did.not suggest that the Vigil Mass was drawing attendees from any other parish than the one in which it is being offered, Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Wellingborough. The point was that without the participation of the OOLW clergy that service would have had to be cancelled when the assistant pastor left the parish. So the Ordinariate Group moved from St Anselm’s, East Barton to OLSH. I hope it is a win-win arrangement. As has been noted previously, the Catholic church in the UK has become dependent on ex-Anglican clergy, and the deployment of those who have entered via the Ordinariate often seems to reflect the needs of the local diocese rather than the members of Ordinariate groups within it.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        EPMS,

        You wrote: The article did.not suggest that the Vigil Mass was drawing attendees from any other parish than the one in which it is being offered, Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Wellingborough.

        Apparently you missed the third full paragraph in the right column on Page 12, which contains a quote attributed to “Mgr. John” (Broadhurst) that commences: “Rushden have ceased their Vigil Mass, some people from there now come here….” But the general discussion leading into that parishes seems to be that many of the parishes in the area are dropping vigil masses as part of a general cut-back in the number of masses due to declining numbers of clergy. If so, many people who can’t get to any of the Sunday masses at their own parish due to work schedules or other commitments will go to another parish nearby parish that still has a vigil mass.

        You wrote: As has been noted previously, the Catholic church in the UK has become dependent on ex-Anglican clergy, and the deployment of those who have entered via the Ordinariate often seems to reflect the needs of the local diocese rather than the members of Ordinariate groups within it.

        If so, this points to a widespread, and very tragic, failure of catechetical programs in the Catholic parishes to evangelize the participants therein.

        Norm.

  2. EPMS says:

    Yes, Norm, I did not read the article carefully enough. So the OOLW clergy are contributing to the worship opportunities of a wide group, which is good, of course. Is this consistent with, or an alternative to, the vision of AC?
    PS Mr Murphy, the icon of the Coptic Martyrs is stunning. Thank you for displaying it.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You asked: So the OOLW clergy are contributing to the worship opportunities of a wide group, which is good, of course. Is this consistent with, or an alternative to, the vision of AC?

      The apostolic constitution Anglicanorum coetibus clearly envisions close collaboration between the clergy of the ordinariates and the dioceses within which they serve. The apostolic constitution itself is relatively brief, with the following provision in Title VIII.

      § 2. Pastors of the Ordinariate enjoy all the rights and are held to all the obligations established in the Code of Canon Law and, in cases established by the Complementary Norms, such rights and obligations are to be exercised in mutual pastoral assistance together with the pastors of the local Diocese where the personal parish of the Ordinariate has been established.

      Article 8 and Article 9 of the associated Complementary Norms, however, amplify on this provision in considerable detail.

      Article 8

      §1. The presbyters, while constituting the presbyterate of the Ordinariate, are eligible for membership in the Presbyteral Council of the Diocese in which they exercise pastoral care of the faithful of the Ordinariate (cf. CIC, can. 498, §2).

      §2. Priests and Deacons incardinated in the Ordinariate may be members of the Pastoral Council of the Diocese in which they exercise their ministry, in accordance with the manner determined by the Diocesan Bishop (cf. CIC, can. 512, §1).

      Article 9

      §1. The clerics incardinated in the Ordinariate should be available to assist the Diocese in which they have a domicile or quasi-domicile, where it is deemed suitable for the pastoral care of the faithful. In such cases they are subject to the Diocesan Bishop in respect to that which pertains to the pastoral charge or office they receive.

      §2. Where and when it is deemed suitable, clergy incardinated in a Diocese or in an Institute of Consecrated Life or a Society of Apostolic Life, with the written consent of their respective Diocesan Bishop or their Superior, can collaborate in the pastoral care of the Ordinariate. In such case they are subject to the Ordinary in respect to that which pertains to the pastoral charge or office they receive.

      §3. In the cases treated in the preceding paragraphs there should be a written agreement between the Ordinary and the Diocesan Bishop or the Superior of the Institute of Consecrated Life or the Moderator of the Society of Apostolic Life, in which the terms of collaboration and all that pertains to the means of support are clearly established.

      So it seems clear that this sort of collaboration was part of the original plan for the formation of ordinariates. And in reality, this arrangement is far less intrusive into matters of the local diocese than the existing arrangements in which the pastors of ordinariate congregations also serve as pastors of the diocesan parishes that host those congregations or the many instances in which ordinariate clergy have assumed chaplaincies under the local diocese. In those arrangements, the clergy of the ordinariate have actually taken on an office of pastoral care. In this case, the is no mention of an office of pastoral care under the jurisdiction of the diocesan bishop.

      Norm.

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