Another new Ordinariate community in Texas

One of our regular readers has pointed us to the following announcement in the latest bulletin of Our Lady of Walsingham Church, Houston:

Congratulations and Welcome to our newest Ordinariate Community!
St. Michael & All Angels Catholic Church in Denison, Texas

Bishop Kevin Farrell officiated with Fr. Charles Hough III this Saturday (March 7) to receive them into Holy Mother Church for the Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter and confirm the entire congregation!

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With their reception into the Catholic Church this community changed its name from Christ Our Saviour Anglican Church (see their facebook page).

Here is their story told by Fr. Clayton Holland on “The Anglo-Catholic” blog in 2010:

“Christ our Saviour Anglican Church in Denison, Texas had its initial formation upon the retirement of the Rev. Clayton T. Holland from a full-time chaplaincy with the Veterans Administration. Fr. Holland, a life-long Anglican, grew up on a farm in southern Michigan and was a member of a truly rural parish. Throughout high school he was the parish organist and knew from the age of 16 that he was destined for the priesthood. After a stint in the Army he graduated from Eastern Michigan University and within three years entered the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Kentucky. Ordained to the Diaconate and the Priesthood in 1962 and transferring to the Episcopal Diocese of Dallas, he served several parishes throughout Texas. In 1975 he began a long time career as Chief of Chaplain Service with the Veterans Administration.

By 1964 Fr. Holland, along with many others, entered into a life-long battle to preserve the doctrine, discipline and liturgical practices of the Anglican expression of the Catholic Faith. Battle after battle was lost and eventually in 1988 the time had come, with the support of his wife Jenny, to make the spiritually and emotionally painful decision to leave the pastoral ministry of the Episcopal Church, though continuing his work in the Veterans Administration until retirement.

After retirement from the VA, a chapel was built over the garage at their home in Denison, and Anglican Services were begun under the patronage of St. Michael and All Angels, named after his home parish in Michigan. This also involved seeking a home with one of the Continuing Anglican Churches that had been formed after the 1977 Congress of Concerned Churchmen in St. Louis, Missouri. The search led to contacting the Most Rev. Lewis W. Falk, Primate of the Anglican Church in America who put him in contact with the late Rt. Rev. Thomas Beckwith of the Diocese of the Southwest.

With Bishop Beckwith’s encouragement, the church facility was transformed into a Seminary, also under the patronage of St. Michael and All Angels. Among the students was the future Rev. Jerry Sherbourne who is now serving as a full time Chaplain with the United States Army under the leadership of Bishop Moyer of the ACA.

By 2005 the parish had outgrown the chapel and after the closing of a parish of another jurisdiction in Denison, a deacon was inherited. The Rev. Randall Fogle of Denison, under the guidance of Archbishop Falk, began his training for his sub conditione ordination to the Diaconate. After his ordination to the Diaconate, Deacon Fogle passed the canonical examinations for ordination to the Priesthood and eventually assumed the Pastoral Ministry at what is now Christ our Saviour Anglican Church.

Christ our Saviour Anglican Church owns its church building, which is a restored former Pentecostal Church. With hard work and limited finances, it has been transformed into a beautiful Anglican church, though with very limited space for additional facilities.

IMG 07281 300x225 Christ Our Saviour Church, Denison, Texas    scan00021 300x200 Christ Our Saviour Church, Denison, Texas

Fr. Fogle celebrates Mass every Sunday at 10:00 AM, preceded by Instruction in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, taught by parishioner Gina Byrum. Since last summer’s DMV Synod we have had between 96 to 100% attendance by the parishioners each Sunday. The parish has voted to enter the Ordinariate as soon as it is formed and acting under the guidance of Archbishop Falk we are continuing our support of the Diocese of the Missouri Valley until that event takes place.

Both Fr. Holland and Fr. Fogle are submitting their ordination records and other papers to Archbishop Falk, and we trust that sometime next year we will become Christ our Saviour Catholic Church within the Anglican Ordinariate in the United States. Fr. Fogle is married to Patty Ford and they are now parents and grandparents. Fr. Holland is a widower and at the age of eighty-one, he limits much of his church work to playing the organ for Sunday Mass and leading a Bible Study following Wednesday evening Vespers, though continuing to dream of future plans for the parish.

Like so many heading for the Ordinariate, it has been a long and often-times painful ministry for Fr. Holland, but following the “Becoming One” conference in San Antonio, a glorious future now seems to lie ahead for a continued Anglican expression of the Catholic Faith within the U.S. Ordinariate.

The hopes that Christ Our Saviour would become an Ordinariate community in 2011 were obviously not fulfilled – so we rejoice that finally the day has arrived when they could be received into the Catholic Church and recover their old name of St. Michael’s.”

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10 Responses to Another new Ordinariate community in Texas

  1. godfrey1099 says:

    1. The longest wait among Ordinariate communities. I will pray that their exceptional perseverance be rewarded with a shower of blessings now.
    2. There have been five established Ordinariate parishes/communities in Texas (OLW Houston, Arlington, Cleburne, Fort Worth, Boerne); now, within a short time frame we have reports about three additional ones in that state: St Margaret’s in Houston, St. Anselm’s in Corpus Christi (long established, but now joining the Ordinariate) and St. Michael in Denison. It makes a total of 8. Looks like the Texas Deanery in its own right.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      godfrey1099,

      You wrote: It makes a total of 8. Looks like the Texas Deanery in its own right.

      Or at least a Texas cluster.

      It appears that the ordinariates generally are not moving to establish deaneries. The real motivation for the establishment of the Deanery of St. John the Baptist for the Canadian communities and membership of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter was necessary to create a distinct Canadian legal entity, facilitating compliance with Canadian law. There’s no equivalent set of legal issues for clusters of communities within the United States, so there’s no urgent need to establish deaneries.

      Norm.

  2. EPMS says:

    Actually the Deanery of St John the Baptist is not a registered entity with the Canada Revenue Agency; its finances are administered through the Dean’s parish. I think it was established as a gesture to Canadian sensibilities. Texan “nationalism” is perhaps somewhat less evident.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: Actually the Deanery of St John the Baptist is not a registered entity with the Canada Revenue Agency; its finances are administered through the Dean’s parish. I think it was established as a gesture to Canadian sensibilities. Texan “nationalism” is perhaps somewhat less evident.

      Regardless of the legal corporate structure, the ordinary stated publicly a while ago that establishment of the deanery was necessary to ensure that Canadian donations remained in Canada. This probably is required due to Canadian legalities and perhaps the eligibility of donations to the ordinariate congregations for tax deduction under Canadian law. The Canadian congregations of the ordinariate apparently turn over the cathedraticum to the deanery rather than to the chancery. My impression is that the deanery in turn pays the cost of travel for visits to Canadian parishes by the ordinary, the dean, and other officials of the ordinariate and the cost of the ordinary’s attendance at meetings of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB).

      Norm.

  3. EPMS says:

    The Canada Revenue Agency determines what qualifies as a registered charity for Canadian tax purposes. The Deanery of St John the Baptist is not a registered charity (as is easily ascertainable on the CRA website) so cathedraticum donations are made to St John the Evangelist, Calgary, as aforementioned.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: The Canada Revenue Agency determines what qualifies as a registered charity for Canadian tax purposes. The Deanery of St John the Baptist is not a registered charity (as is easily ascertainable on the CRA website) so cathedraticum donations are made to St John the Evangelist, Calgary, as aforementioned.

      That does not exclude the possibility that St. John the Evangelist has separate bank accounts and records for deanery funds.

      Norm.

      • EPMS says:

        I’m sure it does keep separate records. It does not have to be any kind of legal entity for this to be the case, however.

  4. Matthew the Wayfarer says:

    Wonderful news. Many Blessings and Many Years!

  5. Matthew the Wayfarer says:

    “St Margaret’s in Houston”? Cannot locate any info on this Ordinariate Mission/Group. There once was an Anglican Use mission in Austin back in the day by that name but it died a swift death.

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