Corpus Christi at Chelston – a first!

Here are some photos of the Corpus Christi celebrations at Chelston (former) Methodist Church, which will hopefully soon become the Ordinariate Parish Church of Our Lady of Walsingham and St. Cuthbert Mayne.

corpus christi chelston 2015 - 1corpus christi chelston 2015 - 2corpus christi chelston 2015 - 3corpus christi chelston 2015 - 5corpus christi chelston 2015 - 6Don’t forget the mydonate button in the right-hand column.

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7 Responses to Corpus Christi at Chelston – a first!

  1. EPMS says:

    I have never seen the Blessed Sacrament taken outside without a canopy or an ombrellino, even improvised, as here: http://stannsbanstead.blogspot.ca/2011/06/corpus-christi-st-anns-style.html
    Is there a rubric about this?

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You asked: I have never seen the Blessed Sacrament taken outside without a canopy or an ombrellino, even improvised, as here: http://stannsbanstead.blogspot.ca/2011/06/corpus-christi-st-anns-style.html
      Is there a rubric about this?

      Yes. Here it is.

      106. Lights, incense, and the canopy under which the priest carrying the blessed sacrament walks should be used in accordance with local customs.

      Source: III. Forms of Worship of the Eucharist: Exposition, Benediction, Processions, Congresses, United States Catholic Conference, 1976, p. 15. (This booklet comprises Chapter III of the section of the Roman Ritual titled “Holy Communion and Worship of the Eucharist Outside of Mass.”)

      Note that “in accordance with local customs” is about as broad as it gets. The “local custom” of some places might omit candles, incense, or a canopy — or even all three.

      But the more profound rubrics may well be the following (boldface mine).

      101. When the eucharist is carried through the streets in a solemn procession with singing, the Christian people give public witness of faith and devotion toward the sacrament.

      It is for the local ordinary, however, to judge whether this is opportune in today’s circumstances, and to determine the time, place, and order of such processions, so that they may be conducted with dignity and without loss of reverence to the sacrament.

      102. The annual procession on the feast of Corpus Christi, or on an appropriate day near this feast, has a special importance and meaning for the pastoral life of the parish or city. It is therefore desirable to continue this procession, in accordance with the law, when today’s circumstances permit and when it can truly be a sign of common faith and adoration.

      Source: Ibid., p. 15.

      The obvious concern is that of those who, not sharing our faith, might not join in adoration, or who might even act with disrespect toward the presence of our Lord in the sacrament, along the route of a procession. In many places, this makes eucharistic processions inappropriate — but, again, the determination rests with the bishop of the local diocese or other local ordinary.

      Sorry not to have responded sooner, but I actually had to look this up. Eucharistic processions are not common in my archdiocese.

      Norm.

      • EPMS says:

        Thank you, I knew we could count on you for a comprehensive answer. How local is “local custom”? The other two UK processions, Mayfair and Borough, had canopys, and of course the one in Banstead, to which I linked, had an ombrellino of sorts.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        EPMS,

        You said: Thank you, I knew we could count on you for a comprehensive answer.

        You’re welcome.

        You asked: How local is “local custom”?

        It could be as local as the parish or other community in the absence of legislation by the diocesan bishop or other ordinary.

        And “local custom” also can change over time, with the pastor’s or bishop’s approval.

        Norm.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        EPMS,

        I wrote: And “local custom” also can change over time, with the pastor’s or bishop’s approval.

        There’s also the situation in which the pastor or sacristan goes to get a canopy out of storage an hour or two before the procession and discovers that moths or mildew have gotten to it, rendering it unusable, and cannot come up with a replacement in time for the procession. The pastor must then choose between cancelling the procession and proceeding without it.

        Norm.

  2. I think the word “baldacchino” is so much nicer than “canopy”. Sorry..

    • Rev22:17 says:

      David,

      You said: I think the word “baldacchino” is so much nicer than “canopy”.

      I suspect that the rubrics adopted the latter term because it is more encompassing: some places may use a “baldacchino” while others may use an “ombrellino” or some other form of canopy.

      Norm.

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