Professor Feulner’s latest article in Liturgy 30/4 (2015)

Professor Hans-Jürgen Feulner KSG, professor of Liturgical Studies and Sacramental Theology at the University of Vienna, member of the “Anglicanae Traditiones” commission, member of the board of the Anglican Use Society and long-time friend of the Ordinariate Expats group, has recently published the following article in the journal “Liturgy” on the ecumenical significance of the new Ordinariate liturgy.

UNITY OF FAITH IN DIVERSITY OF LITURGICAL EXPRESSION: AN ECUMENICAL APPROACH FROM A CATHOLIC PERSPECTIVE BY MEANS OF THE “ANGLICAN USE OF THE ROMAN RITE”
by Hans-Jürgen Feulner

Prosper of Aquitaine’s well-known ancient Christian principle “lex orandi, lex credendi” (“the law of praying [is] the law of believing” –– and vice versa) refers to the indispensable relationship between worship and belief. It has long governed the liturgical celebrations of the Church. Nevertheless, it does not require a rigid uniformity of liturgical expression for keeping the unity of faith. This essay will explore the recent incorporation of groups of former Anglicans into the Roman Catholic Church together with the preservation of their Anglican liturgical patrimony to demonstrate the legitimate diversity of liturgical expression in the Church, also in the West, as background for the movement toward unity in a diverse community of believers.

Diversity of Liturgical Expression — Western Non-Roman Rites and Liturgical Usages

In the preface to his first Book of Common Prayer (1549), Edward VI wrote:

“And where heretofore, there hath been great diversitie in saying and synging in churches within this realme: some folowyng Salsbury use, some Hereford use, some the use of Banger, some of York, and some of Lincolne: Now from henceforth, all the whole realme shall have but one use.”

Until the time of the English Reformation, at least five liturgical uses or diocesan usages in the English church mirrored a widespread diversity of liturgical expression in Europe that still exists today. Diversity continued in the Catholic Church even after the Council of Trent (1545–1563) with its move toward a standardization of the liturgy of the Latin Church, the largest and most significant ritual church within the Catholic Church.

(in order to continue reading, you can access the pdf available here)

[ © in: Liturgy 30/4 (2015) pp. 10–19 (published online July 17, 2015: http://www.tandfonline.com ]

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2 Responses to Professor Feulner’s latest article in Liturgy 30/4 (2015)

  1. Andrew says:

    I am surprised that the professor is so against “proselytism”. What distinguishes that from evangelism? If the Catholic church believes its own claims, should it not be proselytizing? I recall the pope Francis has made similar comments.

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