Tonight at Warwick Street: Vespers of the Dead for the Stuart Kings

From the Royal Stuart Society

King James II (of England) and VIII (of Scotland), in exile in France with his family, in 1694.

King James II (of England) and VIII (of Scotland), in exile in France
with his family, in 1694.

By kind permission of the Right Reverend Keith Newton, Ordinary of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham,
and the Reverend Mark Elliott-Smith, Rector of the Church of Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick Street
and
under the patronage of His Grace the Duke of St Albans, the Governor-General of the Royal Stuart Society,
and the Chairman, Lord Aylmer, and the Council of the Royal Stuart Society

Vespers of the Dead
will be sung at
6.30pm
on
Wednesday 16 September 2015
in the
Church of Our Lady of the Assumption
and St Gregory
at
Warwick Street, London W1B 5LZ
for the repose of the souls of
King James II and VII, King James III and VIII
and
the deceased members of the
Royal House of Stuart

the day of death of King James II & VII of England, Scotland, Ireland and France (de jure)

Chant schola of Corpus Christi Maiden Lane
And of St Bede Clapham Park

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4 Responses to Tonight at Warwick Street: Vespers of the Dead for the Stuart Kings

  1. EPMS says:

    Did this service have elements of the Anglican Patrimony,? I suppose that would have been something James II experienced in his youth, however reluctantly. A closed book to the Old Pretender, of course. The concept, however, with its overtones of the Charles, King and Martyr Society, is a wonderful gust of old-school Anglo-Catholic preciosity.

  2. Matt C says:

    Stupid question: why Vespers and not a Requiem Mass? After all, James II was a Catholic (and a saintly one by the end of his life from what I’ve read).

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Matt,

      You asked: tupid question: why Vespers and not a Requiem Mass? After all, James II was a Catholic (and a saintly one by the end of his life from what I’ve read).

      Here are a couple very significant considerations.

      1. Vespers from the Office of the Dead is every bit as Catholic as a requiem mass, even though many members of the Catholic Church are not familiar with it.

      2. A mass gets sticky when a significant number of those in attendance are not Catholic due to the issue of intercommunion. In fact, it sounds like the organization that requested the service is not, even though James II was.

      Overall, it sounds like vespers from the Office of the Dead is the better choice in this situation.

      A footnote: when the pastor asked if we would like a prayer service during her wake over a decade ago, I suggested vespers from the Office of the Dead. This shocked the pastor, who subsequently explained that the parish did not get very many such requests. But when vespers ended, I overheard several of the people in attendance remarking to those around them, “That was very nice!” We need to do more of this!

      Norm.

  3. EPMS says:

    Are either of the representatives of the Royal Stuart Society Catholics? If not, that might explain the choice. I believe the Duke of St Alban’s is distantly descended from Nell Gwynn, one of Charles II’s Protestant acquaintances.

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